Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 
    
    May 24, 2024  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Kinesiology

  
  • KIN 481 - Research in Kinesiology

    Credits 1 - 3
    Provides supervised research experience on an approved topic within the disciplines of kinesiology. Emphasis on data collection, analysis and presentation of the work in written form (e.g., research manuscript) and/or oral presentation (e.g., professional meeting; FPU Undergraduate Research Day). Specific requirements determined on an individual basis and reflect the number of registered course units.
    Faculty consent required. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • KIN 485 - Senior Seminar

    Credits 2
    Culminating experience course that primarily focuses on final preparation and presentation of a senior portfolio. Professionalism is more formally visited with an emphasis on reviewing and revision of the personal professional philosophy. Students write resumes and gain experience in interviewing for jobs. Students are exposed to a biblical view of leadership and ethics. Should be taken during the last spring semester of the academic contract.
    May not be audited.
  
  • KIN 486 - Topics in Physical Education

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.

Liberal Arts

  
  • LA 180 - Paths to Teaching

    Credits 3
    Provides an orientation to the role of a teacher in an urban, multilingual, general education classroom. Includes an introduction to requirements for teacher credentialing. Examines other school settings, including private, home, charter, suburban and rural schools, as well as bilingual and special education classrooms.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LA 322 - Discovery Learning in the Mind, Brain and Body

    Credits 3
    Students develop an understanding of how people process information and learn; studying the history, content and application of learning theories, intelligence and thinking dispositions, including the development of the mind and brain and its role in education.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 324 - Memory Tools: Mind Maps

    Credits 1
    Helping the memory recall and retrieve information is the goal of this course, using pictorial arrangements known as mind maps (a form of "graphic organizer"). Mind maps form a powerful visual picture of information and allow the mind to see undiscovered patterns and relationships. Students will learn how to use mind maps as a learning tool for any subject area, as well as a tool for brainstorming, organizing thoughts and generating ideas.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 325 - Emotional Intelligence

    Credits 3
    Introduces issues related to the study of emotions, including reviews of theories that concern functions, mechanisms and meaning of emotions, as well as the role of emotions in human development, thinking, memory and social interactions. How individuals regulate moods and deal with overwhelming emotions will be considered, along with the nature of specific emotions such as love, hostility, fear and disgust. A personalized emotional intelligence profile and application to leadership and teamwork will be analyzed.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 326 - Technology for Educators

    Credits 3
    Introduces the student to educational technology and critical issues related to the effective integration of technology into the classroom. Emerging trends and issues as well as implications of the digital world in relation to ethical, legal, and equity issues in a global society are introduced. Students gain an understanding of the field, develop skills using digital tools, and formulate their own philosophy of educational technology.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 380 - Learning Communities

    Credits 3
    A seminar course with two hours per week of field experience that will focus on learning communities of elementary educational systems. The course will involve analysis and evaluation of classroom observations in relation to academic studies of the multiple subject programs.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LA 381 - Introduction to Teaching

    Credits 3
    A seminar course with appropriate field experiences that will focus on learning communities for which the multiple subject credential is required of its teachers. The course will involve analysis and evaluation of classroom observations in relation to academic studies of the multiple subject program.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LA 383 - Power of Optimism

    Credits 1
    Based on the premise that optimism is a skill that can be learned, students acquire background knowledge in the psychology of optimism, understand their own optimist/ pessimist tendencies in light of those definitions and leave with specific, practical skills for engaging the strategies of successful optimists. Final study is highly application-oriented and focuses on harnessing the power of optimism, with particular emphasis on how to do so in the workplace and on the role of faith in maintaining hope.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 384 - The Art of Motivation

    Credits 1
    An overview of motivational research in psychology, management and education. Explores how social environments shape and influence individual motivation. Students develop effective leadership strategies that promote motivation, learn verbal encouragement techniques that motivate by reinforcing participant's effort and reducing risk and discover how purposeful work and goal achievement can support all types of learners and employees.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 385 - Critical Approaches to Teaching

    Credits 3
    A seminar course with two hours per week of field experience that will focus on learning communities of secondary educational systems. The course will involve analysis and evaluation of classroom observations in relation to academic studies of the subject matter waiver programs.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LA 386 - Increasing Personal Effectiveness

    Credits 1
    Presents an approach to understanding one's effectiveness through a lens of grace. Interaction with faculty and students are collaborative with a focus on learning to reflect, share, dialogue and present one's story and one's response to becoming more effective. The final project is a formation to start the journey of personal effectiveness--a response to a calling of living and being shaped by grace.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 405 - Pathways in Education

    Credits 3
    Examines the macro-level, holistic, systemic faith-related, cultural, societal and political issues for students to imagine education in a contextual framework. Addresses issues that surround preparation for the California state standards for the teaching profession and content standards. Prepares students to express a Christian perspective on issues critical to the profession and to integrate their perspective with a myriad of issues.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 415 - Senior Research Seminar

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: LA-405 and LA-381. A capstone course focusing on an interdisciplinary analysis of issues and topics relevant to future educators in California's Central Valley. The culminating activity will be an integrative research project presented orally and in writing.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LA 486 - Topics: Liberal Studies

    Credits 3

Language Studies

  
  • LANG 170 - English for Academic Purposes

    Credits 3
    At an advanced level, develops the process of writing, revising and editing compositions, a process which includes logical development and organization of ideas; develops analytical and critical thinking skills by reading and responding to student's own writing; reinforces grammar skills through self-editing instruction in complex linguistic structures. May be repeated up to three times for credit.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LANG 171 - English for Academic Purposes

    Credits 3
    At an advanced level, develops the process of writing, revising and editing compositions, a process which includes logical development and organization of ideas; analytical and critical thinking skills by reading and responding to student's own writing; grammar skills through self-editing instruction in complex linguistic structures.
    May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LANG 286 - Topics in Language

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LANG 310 - First and Second Language Acquisition

    Credits 3
    An introduction to the ways human beings acquire a first and second language and the conditions that support acquisition.
  
  • LANG 310L - First and Second Language Acquisition Lab

    Credits 1
    Must a student learn language in a classroom only? If not, how can a person learn a language from and in the midst of a community? This course introduces students to methods for acquiring a language in a community context. Emphasis is on how to develop and implement a plan for befriending people, learning with them and practicing words and phrases that facilitate real-life communication.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LANG 311 - Principles of Language Acquisition

    Credits 3
    Overview of first and second language acquisition theories, learning styles, sociocultural factors and communicative competence, with an emphasis on second language acquisition.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LANG 331 - Linguistics and Modern Grammar

    Credits 3
    A study of the structure of the English language through an analysis of phonology, morphology and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the sentence as a primary structure and the application of grammar to writing.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LANG 340 - Introduction to Linguistics

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-110, COM-120. This course will serve as an introduction to linguistics, the science of language. Linguistics is often classified as a Social Science because the knowledge and use of language is an essential component in our functioning as social beings. Linguistics is a field that looks at language from many different angles.
  
  • LANG 350 - Modern English Grammar

    Credits 3
    A structural examination of modern English using both pregenerative treatments of English grammar and transformational models, with an emphasis on their pedagogical application in the teaching of English, particularly in relation to writing development.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LANG 420 - Teaching English as an Additional Language

    Credits 3
    This course will acquaint those interested in teaching English to adults in foreign (EFL) or domestic (ESL) settings with current theories and models of second language acquisition, as well as assist them in developing an approach to teaching adult language learners that is sensitive to the learning context. Attention will be paid to the role of individual learning differences, culture, teaching purposes, teaching setting and values in the teaching and learning of English in EFL and ESL settings. Case studies will help students connect theory and practice. This course is particularly useful for those who may find themselves in domestic or foreign settings in which as native or near-native speakers of English they will be invited to teach English as a foreign or second language.
  
  • LANG 486 - Topics in Language

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LANG 496 - Language Studies Internship

    Credits 3
    Allows students in the language studies minor or concentration to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a real-world setting. Students work with international students in Fresno Pacific University's Intensive English Language Program or in an off-campus site that allows for interaction with English language learners.
    May not be audited.

Latin American and Caribbean Studies

  
  • LACS 300 - Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies

    Credits 3
    Review of the historical facts of colonization of Latin America and the Caribbean that launched the immigration process to the United States. Discussion of the wide and diverse scope of the most representative groups of Hispanics in the US will provide a contextual parameter for further interpretation of the Latin American reality.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LACS 302 - Mexican Folklorico Dance

    Credits 3
    Introductory overview of Mexican folk dance, including lecture, discussion, practice of dance technique and performance. Historical and cultural information will be provided to contextualize the dance styles within particular regions of Mexico and in the United States.

Leadership Studies

  
  • LEAD 100 - Leadership Team Retreat

    Credits 1
    This activity is an invitation-only event for selected student leaders and president's scholars. Emphasis is on team building and exploring theological and character issues that form the foundation of servant-leadership. Program includes both on- and off-campus locations.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LEAD 101 - Learning to Lead

    Credits 1
    Introduces students to a sampling of leadership concepts, principles and practices. Explores leading in the context of self, family, community and non-profit organizations. Invites self-reflection on leadership potential.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LEAD 120 - Perspectives in Leadership

    Credits 1
    Survey of disciplinary perspectives on leadership. Focus is on issues and contributions of diverse fields of study regarding leadership.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LEAD 120H - Perspectives in Leadership

    Credits 1
    Exploration and application of principles of Christian leadership, using selected readings from secular, Christian and biblical sources with lectures, self-assessment, discussion and short writing assignments.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LEAD 200 - Theories of Leadership

    Credits 3
    In-depth review and analysis of dominant leadership theories and themes. Emphasizes the historical development of leadership as a field of study, as well as the contribution of theory to the practice of leadership.
  
  • LEAD 300 - Leadership Conflict Resolution

    Credits 1
    This course is designed to build conflict resolution and supportive skills in resident assistants and other student leaders. The format will be 10 hours of training sessions, with additional reading such as the Little Book of Restorative Justice and PACS CR Training Manual and two five-page papers. Students will learn options for handling conflict, how to recognize and break unmanaged conflict cycles, listening and basic mediation skills.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • LEAD 320 - Operations and Organizations

    Credits 1
    Study of technical and social functions and skills required to support effective leadership behavior. Specific requirements of leaders in day-to-day situations and at significant events will be addressed.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LEAD 405 - Leadership Concepts and Practice

    Credits 3
    Prepares students for leadership roles in their organizations, community and chosen professions. Provides students with the knowledge, skills and practical tools necessary to be a modern leader. Students study values-based leadership, as well as servant-based leadership and learn how to become an effective leader, how to motivate staff, implement mission and how to manage change.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LEAD 476 - Internship

    Credits 1 - 3
    In-depth, integrative field-service experience. In addition to a valuable service to constituents, provides a focused, consistent context for service and reflection. Requires evidence of learning through portfolio compilation and a presentation of program impact.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LEAD 486 - Topics in Leadership

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.

Literature

  
  • LIT 180 - Introduction to Literature

    Credits 3
    A study of outstanding examples of the short story, novel, poetry and drama genres. Designed to introduce the student to the world of literature, to create an appreciation for it and to provide analytical tools for further study.
  
  • LIT 181 - Exploring Literature

    Credits 3
    Examination of literary concepts, conventions and genres through close reading and written analyses of novels, drama and poetry.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • LIT 286 - Topics in Literature

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LIT 355 - American Literature: Beginnings to 19th Century

    Credits 3
    A study of poetry, fiction and nonfiction during this period of literature, including such authors as Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickinson, Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman. Texts will be studied in relation to their cultural and historical contexts.
  
  • LIT 360 - American Literature: 20th Century

    Credits 3
    Study and analysis of American writers from diverse ethnic, cultural and racial backgrounds who challenge traditional definitions of American identity. Authors may include Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath and Gloria Anzaldua.
  
  • LIT 364 - Hispanic Literature of the United States

    Credits 3
    Study of literature written in English by Hispanic writers living in the United States. Examines the ways in which many writers wrestle with their identities as natives of the Southwest before the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, as immigrants, or as the children of immigrants. May include Central Valley authors such as Pam Munoz Ryan, Juan Felipe Herrera, and Gary Soto.
  
  • LIT 370 - The Novel

    Credits 3
    A study of the novel as a distinct literary form. Course includes canonical and non-canonical texts from a variety of cultures; variations on the novelistic form, historical developments, and genres; and special emphasis on critical theory.
  
  • LIT 370H - The Novel

    Credits 3
    A study of the novel as a distinct literary form. Course includes canonical and non-canonical texts from a variety of cultures; variations on the novelistic form, historical developments, and genres; and special emphasis on critical theory.
  
  • LIT 380 - World Theater: Roots to 1800

    Credits 3
    A study of early forms of theater from Africa, South and Central America, Greece and Rome, India and Japan, with attention to the role of religion in the making of early performance texts. Also explores European playtexts from the medieval to the neoclassical periods.
  
  • LIT 385 - World Theater: 1800 to Present

    Credits 3
    A study of performance texts of the 19th to the 21st centuries, drawn from various styles (e.g., realist, expressionist, absurdist, epic theater, protest theater, the musical, performance art) and perspectives (e.g., national, colonial, post-colonial, ethnic, multicultural).
  
  • LIT 400 - Medieval Life, Thought and Literature

    Credits 4
    A study of the intellectual and cultural life of High Middle Ages and the literature of Medieval England. Topical studies include chivalric life and romance, the literature and theology of romantic love, scholasticism and the via antiqua, theological and philosophical poetry, allegory as literature and as interpretive technique, popular literature and culture and the English mystics. Readings include selections from 12th through 14th century philosophers, theologians and mystics, as well as Arthurian Romance, Chaucer, Langland and the Gawain Poet.
  
  • LIT 405 - England in the Renaissance World

    Credits 3
    Through readings in the humanist literature of Italy and England, this course covers the development of the early modern outlook from Petrarch through the English Renaissance ending with Milton. Thought patterns, ideas and typical genre are examined including the literature of the court; use and appreciation of the classics; epic, sonnet, pastoral and Italianate drama; the poetry of religious experience; and the distinctive character of the Christian humanist tradition in thought and poetry.
  
  • LIT 415 - Shakespeare

    Credits 3
    A study of Shakespeare's major dramatic works, including comedies, tragedies, histories and later romances. Course includes attention to historical contexts, literary criticism, and historical and contemporary adaptations.
  
  • LIT 415H - Shakespeare

    Credits 3
    A study of Shakespeare's major dramatic works, including comedies, tragedies, histories and later romances. Course includes attention to historical contexts, literary criticism, and historical and contemporary adaptations.
    Faculty consent required. May not be audited.
  
  • LIT 420 - English Literature: Romantic and Victorian Literature

    Credits 3
    A study of selected poetry, drama, and fiction from these two periods. Course includes both canonical and non-canonical texts, with emphasis on literary criticism, critical theory, and historical backgrounds.
  
  • LIT 425 - English Literature: 20th Century Literature

    Credits 3
    A study of key examples of British literature produced in the last century, including poetry, children's literature short fiction, novels, and graphic novels. Course considers major literary movements of the period, with attention to literary criticism, critical theory, and historical backgrounds.
  
  • LIT 425H - English Literature: 20th Century Literature

    Credits 3
    A study of key examples of British literature produced in the last century, including poetry, children's literature short fiction, novels, and graphic novels. Course considers major literary movements of the period, with attention to literary criticism, critical theory, and historical backgrounds.
    Faculty consent required. May not be audited.
  
  • LIT 426 - English Literature: C.S. Lewis

    Credits 3
    A study of C.S. Lewis's memoir, fiction, poetry and nonfiction, as well as a biography of his life and the film Shadowlands.
  
  • LIT 448 - Multicultural Literature

    Credits 3
    The cultural and ethnic voices of California including Hispanic, Native American, Japanese American, Chinese American, Vietnamese, Hmong and African American writers provide the focus for the reading and analysis of literature in this course.
  
  • LIT 448H - Multicultural Literature

    Credits 3
    The cultural and ethnic voices of California including Hispanic, Native American, Japanese American, Chinese American, Vietnamese, Hmong and African American writers provide the focus for the reading and analysis of literature in this course.
  
  • LIT 449 - Literature and Film

    Credits 3
    This course will focus on literary texts and their film adaptations. The course will examine the formal differences between literature and film; techniques of adaptation; and the role of historical, cultural and political issues in the adaptation process.
  
  • LIT 460 - Critical Approaches to Literature

    Credits 3
    An examination of several methods for evaluating and analyzing literature and introduction to literary criticism with application of techniques to literary genre.
  
  • LIT 465 - Literature for Children and Young Adults

    Credits 3
    This course is a survey course in the literature for children from preschool through junior high school. The course is particularly designed to assist teachers and teacher candidates in the selection and use of literature in the classroom.
  
  • LIT 467 - Literature for Children and Young Adults

    Credits 3
    This course surveys literature for children from preschool through junior high school. The course is particularly designed to assist teachers and teacher candidates in the selection and use of literature in the classroom.
    May not be audited.
  
  • LIT 480 - Narrative

    Credits: 3
    Narrative is a way of knowing. The stories we hear and tell shape the trajectory of our lives. This course examines narrative knowing and story from the perspectives of biblical narrative, history and culture, storytelling, the construction of a personal narrative, narrative structures and response to others' stories. Narrative research methodologies will be employed to apprehend stories of faith and experience. The course meets capstone requirement for English, communication and drama majors.
    Prerequisite: LIT-180
  
  • LIT 486 - Topics in Literature

    Credits 1 - 3
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • LIT 496 - Literature Internship

    Credits 1 - 3
    Provides students in the English major with an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a real world setting such as a library, high school or publishing company.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.

Mathematics

  
  • MATH 110A - Principles of Mathematics I

    Credits 2
    MATH-110A and MATH-110B constitute a year-long slower paced version of Principles of Mathematics. Both MATH-110A and 110B must be taken to satisfy the general education requirement. MATH-110A provides exposure to a wide spectrum of mathematics. Rigorous problem-solving techniques using inductive and deductive reasoning will be studied. Topics include finite difference, Pascal's triangle, permutations and combinations.
  
  • MATH 110B - Principles of Mathematics II

    Credits 2
    A continuation of MATH-110A. Topics include probability, statistics, number theory and topology. Includes problem solving experiences using computers. Both MATH-110A and 110B must be taken to satisfy the general education requirement.
  
  • MATH 120 - Principles of Mathematics

    Credits 4
    In this course students are exposed to a wide spectrum of mathematics. Rigorous problem-solving techniques using inductive and deductive reasoning are studied. Course topics include finite differences, Pascal's triangle, permutations, combinations, probability, statistics, number theory and topology.
  
  • MATH 121 - Mathematical Problem Solving

    Credits 3
    This course provides a broad survey of mathematical techniques and topics, including problem solving from inductive and deductive perspectives. Topics include finite differences, Pascal's triangle, permutations, combinations, probability, statistics, number theory and topology.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 132 - Arithmetic and Data Analysis

    Credits 3
    This course is one of the two courses required for liberal studies majors intending to be elementary school teachers. The purpose of the course is to strengthen the students' conceptual understanding of the mathematics taught in the K-7 settings. Topics will include: Numeration systems, a variety of algorithmic structures in arithmetic, simple set theory, probability, descriptive statistics, graphical interpretations of data, construction of appropriate graphical structures.
  
  • MATH 134 - Algebraic Thinking and Geometry

    Credits 3
    This course is one of the two courses required for liberal studies majors intending to be elementary school teachers. The purpose of the course is to strengthen the students' conceptual understanding of mathematics taught in the K-7 settings. Topics will include: The interplay of algebra and arithmetic, generalization of algorithms from arithmetic to algebra, functions and equations, the hierarchical ordering of operations, basic analytic geometry, elementary geometric ideas of area, perimeter, classification, and spatial relationships.
  
  • MATH 136 - Mathematics Concepts I

    Credits 3
    Designed to prepare liberal arts majors for teaching at the elementary level. Topics include problem-solving strategies, number theory, algorithms for operations with numbers, prime numbers, rational numbers, proportions and probability.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 137 - Mathematics Concepts II

    Credits 3
    Designed to prepare Liberal Arts majors for teaching at the elementary level. Focus is on various applications of the mathematical concepts introduced in part I as they are used in graphing linear equations, algebraic problem solving and geometric measurements.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 140 - Pre-Calculus

    Credits 4
    An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytic reasoning skills used in college science and math. The course focuses on algebraic relations, functions, graphs, interpreting graphical information, elementary problem solving, abstract modeling and exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
  
  • MATH 140A - Precalculus I

    Credits 2
    This course is the first part of a series: MATH 140A/B. Both courses are required to fulfill equivalent credit to MATH 140 Precalculus. An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytic reasoning skills used in college science and math, particularly in calculus. This course focuses on algebraic relations, functions, graphs, interpreting graphical information, elementary problem solving, abstract modeling, and exponential and logarithmic functions (part I) and trigonometric functions (part II).
  
  • MATH 140B - Precalculus II

    Credits 2
    This course is the second part of a series: MATH 140A/B. Both courses are required to fulfill equivalent credit to MATH 140 Precalculus. An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytic reasoning skills used in college science and math, particulary in calculus. This course focuses on algebraic relations, functions, graphs, interpreting graphical information, elementary problem solving, abstract modeling and exponential and logarithmic functions (part I) and trigonometric functions (part II).
  
  • MATH 205 - Introductory Statistics

    Credits: 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 140  Statistical analysis lie at the intersection of the abstraction of the physical world and the formulation of theories to explain its phenomena. Its study of populations and their samples allow us to make judgments about our worldview grounded in the mathematical tradition; all to better understand God's creation. This course will cover the three pillars of statistical analysis: 1) defining the types of characteristics that are capable of being measured, 2) designing principles of data collection, and 3) understanding of probability and its application when employing statistical testing or modeling.
    May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 206L - Introductory Statistics Lab

    Credits 1
    Students will learn the correct application of statistical analysis in a spreadsheet computer program. They will at the end of the course be proficient in the use of a spreadsheet computer program such that they are able to analyze large datasets (1000s of samples). Students will learn how to correctly power a comparison and perform parametric and non-parametric tests of categorical and numerical data. Students will complete a course project wherein they will demonstrate their understanding of design, collection, analysis, and communication of data. Recommended prior coursework: MATH-140
  
  • MATH 210 - Calculus I

    Credits 4
    Analytic geometry, relations and functions, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of differentiation.
  
  • MATH 220 - Calculus II

    Credits 4
    Integration, applications of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, techniques of integration.
  
  • MATH 230 - Calculus III

    Credits 4
    Fourier series and applications, vectors in the plane, vectors in space, dot and cross products. Calculus of polar and parametric curves, ideal projectile motion, the TNB reference frame, arc length parameter. Partial derivatives, partial derivatives with constrained variables, directional derivatives, Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals and applications, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, substitutions in multiple integrals.
  
  • MATH 250 - Introduction to Statistics

    Credits 3
    Introduces basic concepts of analysis and interpretation of data collected in a statistical frame work. Primary course objectives are to develop mastery of basic statistical concepts, to develop the ability to apply these concepts correctly, to communicate effectively in writing the results of a statistical analysis and to gain exposure to modern statistical computing software. Topics include but are not limited to summarizing and graphing data, central tendency, measures of variations, measures of position, binomial distribution, normal distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA).
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 286 - Topics in Mathematics

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • MATH 320 - Principles of Geometry

    Credits 3
    Fundamental concepts of Euclidean geometry from the modern point of view; axioms of collinearity, order, congruence, theorems of Ceva and Menelaus, loci, transformations of the plane; selected topics from geometry of the circle and triangle; non-Euclidean geometries.
  
  • MATH 325 - Introduction to Topology

    Credits 3
    Covers fundamentals of topology, including topology of line and plane, topological spaces, continuous function and homeomorphisms, basis for topology, metric spaces, connectedness and compactness.
    May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 330 - Abstract Algebra

    Credits 3
    Groups, rings, integral domains, ordered fields, isomorphisms; rational, real and complex numbers.
  
  • MATH 331 - Abstract Algebra II

    Credits 3
    A continuation of MATH-330, this course covers rings, fields, Sylow theorems, symmetry and counting and introduction to Galois theory.
    May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 335 - Linear Algebra

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-220. Techniques for solving systems of equations, examination of existence and uniqueness of solutions, matrix operations, matrix inverses, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, vector spaces, linear transformations, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization and applications of linear algebra to calculus, least squares solutions and differential equations.
  
  • MATH 340 - Number Theory

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-350. Divisibility, prime numbers, greatest common divisor, Euler's function, arithmetic functions, congruences, Diophantine equations and continued fractions.
  
  • MATH 345 - Numerical Analysis

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-220, MATH-335, CSSE-121. Elementary discussion of sources and propagations of errors, numerical solutions to linear systems of equations and nonlinear equations, numerical techniques for solving the algebraic eigenvalue problem, numerical differentiation and integration.
  
  • MATH 350 - Problem Solving

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 210   Recommended prior coursework: MATH-210. An investigation of the process of problem solving in mathematics. Topics studied include specialization, generalization, analogy, induction, recursion, etc. Practice in applying these ideas to a variety of non-routine problems, and presenting solutions and proofs in written and oral formats.
  
  • MATH 357 - Operations Research

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 210   Introduction to mathematical optimization with applications to business and finance. Graphical and numerical solutions, using the simplex method and linear programming. Duality, transportation and assignment problems, network optimization, dynamic programming, integer programming, nonlinear programming, simulated annealing, introduction to game theory and decision analysis. A brief introduction to queuing and inventory theory.
    May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 360 - Probability and Statistical Methods

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 230   Recommended prior coursework: MATH-230. Brief overview of descriptive statistics, basic probability theory, counting methods, Bayes' theorem and applications. Discrete and continuous random variables and their respective distributions, expected values, variance, the central limit theorem. Joint probability distributions, covariance and correlation. Inferential statistics, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, introduction to analysis of variance. Linear regression and correlation, nonlinear and multiple regression.
  
  • MATH 362 - Mathematical Statistics

    Credits 3
    Basic probability theory, discrete distribution, moment generating functions, continuous distribution functions, bivariate distribution functions of random variables, the Central Limit Theorem Parameter estimation, random number generation, confidence intervals, sample size, regression analysis, non-parametric method, hypothesis testing.
    May not be audited.
  
  • MATH 365 - Differential Equations

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 220   Recommended prior coursework: MATH-335. This course emphasizes approaches to solving first-order and second-order linear differential equations, numerical solutions. Both qualitative and quantitative solutions are emphasized. In addition, students are introduced to the existence-uniqueness theorem and to applications in the physical and life sciences.
  
  • MATH 370 - Discrete Mathematics

    Credits 3
    Counting techniques, mathematical induction, set theory, algebra of matrices, difference equations, graphs, trees, Boolean algebra and algorithms.
  
  • MATH 375 - Introduction to Game Theory

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior course: MATH 210   Game theory is a collection of mathematical models used to study situations involving conflict and/or cooperation. This contemporary mathematical subject is concerned with human interactions, competitive encounters, notions of value, bargaining and negotiations and fairness. It has application throughout social, systems, behavior, managerial and decision sciences. The course covers two person zero sum non-cooperative games, two person general sum non-cooperative games, two person general sum cooperative games, games in extensive form and games in n-person coalitional form.
    May not be audited.
 

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