Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 
    
    May 24, 2024  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Communication

  
  • COM 455 - Philosophy of Language

    Credits 3
    A study of significant 20th century schools of thought concerning language. Disciplines encountered include philosophy, cognitive science, literary theory, sociolinguistics and etymological studies. Readings include Carroll, Lycan, Pinker, Wittgenstein, Barthes and Borges.
  
  • COM 460 - Projects in Communication

    Credits 3
    A tutorial course designed for students who wish concentrated work on a major communication project. Emphasis must be on the creation of a communication message. Projects may include the creation of verbal, media, dramatic or multimedia messages. Special projects in play direction may be included in this course. Attention will be given to the theory related to the particular project, the creative development of the project and criticism of the form and message selected.
    May not be audited.
  
  • COM 480 - Narrative

    Credits 3
    Narrative is a way of knowing. The stories we hear and tell shape the trajectory of our lives. This course examines narrative knowing and story from the perspectives of biblical narrative, history and culture, storytelling, the construction of a personal narrative, narrative structures and response to others' stories. Narrative research methodologies will be employed to apprehend stories of faith and experience. The course meets capstone requirement for English, communication and drama majors.
    May not be audited.
  
  • COM 483 - Mediation Practicum

    Credits 1
    An opportunity for intensive training in mediation leading to a supervised experience in mediating actual conflicts. The practical component may be completed with the Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP) or other appropriate mediation programs, or the student may arrange to mediate an informal dispute situation approved by the instructor.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • COM 486 - Topics in Communication

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • COM 496 - Communication Internship

    Credits 1 - 3
    The communication internship provides a workplace and professional context in which students engage reflective practice to understand communication in its application to profession, career, and work experience. The internship is required for the major to provide insight and exposure to settings in which communication content, behavior, and theory is critical.
    May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.

Computer Information Systems

  
  • CIS 286 - Topics:

    Credits 1 - 4
  
  • CIS 302 - Discrete Structures

    Credits 3
    The study and application of counting techniques, propositional logic, mathematical induction, set theory, recursive equations, graphs, trees, and Boolean algebra for algorithms in computing.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 312 - Introduction to Computer Information Systems

    Credits 3
    A survey of computer information systems as used in business and industry. Topics include hardware, operating systems, networks and communication, database management and other applications, programming, security and date management, and ethical concerns and practices in the field. The programming emphasis will increase in the second half of the course.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 320 - Computer Programming for Information Systems

    Credits 3
    Computer programming for information systems applications, highlighting data and control structures, using a current industry language.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 330 - Operating Systems

    Credits 3
    An examination of systems architecture and control in computers dealing specifically with operating systems. Emphasis is placed on organization, use, configuration, capabilities, and security of operating systems.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 340 - Data Communications and Networks

    Credits 3
    Fundamentals of data communication and networking. This course highlights network structures, performance, and security and their role in information systems solutions.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 352 - Systems Analysis and Design

    Credits 3
    The study of the computing methods and technologies available to modern organizations to implement strategy and conduct operations. Emphasis is placed on the process of identifying and specifying requirements to solve organizational problems.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 380 - Database Management Systems

    Credits 3
    An analysis of the management of data and information using a database system. Focus is put on relational databases and queries, joins, views, indexing, sequences, and security.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 390 - Ethics in Computing

    Credits 2
    The social and ethical issues in computer information systems development and practice including support for quality, security, and privacy.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 392 - Computer Information Systems Project Proposal

    Credits 1
    The social and ethical issues in computer information systems development and practice including support for quality, security, and privacy.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 440 - Systems and Network Security

    Credits 2
    Study of information security and assurance as a key component in information systems and networked solutions. Security planning as part of management process with emphasis on protection, response, and feasibility in safeguarding an organization's information and operations.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 457 - Information Systems Project Management

    Credits 3
    Study of the development and management practices utilized in information systems projects and processes, including various techniques and their assessment under different environments.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 480 - Application Development With Database

    Credits 3
    Advanced topics in relational databases including opportunities for students to create database applications to address information management needs and address related issues. Increased emphasis is placed on security, productivity, performance, and recovery.
    Take CIS 390  
    May not be audited.
  
  • CIS 486 - Topics:

    Credits 1 - 4
  
  • CIS 490 - Computer Information Systems Project

    Credits 1
    A cooperative experience with local industry or nonprofit to address a computer information system need via a team-based project. Students work with project coordinator to discuss planning and implementation progress. Students will present their experiences and results to the FPU community.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 112L - Exploring Computer Science With Projects

    Credits 1
    Students will develop algorithms using various programming languages and apply programming fundamentals in projects. Students will analyze the societal impact of computing by investigating a current topic.
    May not be audited.

Collegiate Preparation

  
  • CP 118 - College Success Strategies

    Credits 1
    The course will examine the proven attitudes and behaviors that positively affect student success in post-secondary education. Topics include time management, academic skills and self-care.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • CP 150 - University Success

    Credits 3
    An introduction to Fresno Pacific University and its resources. Skills and techniques for enhancing learning outcomes in degree completion programs. Topics include adult learning, self-understanding, life planning, study skills, presentation skills, time management, overall strategies for success and critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CP 152 - College Transitions and Success

    Credits 0 - 1
    This transition seminar aids freshman and transfer students in the following areas: 1) successful navigation of the transition to the Fresno Pacific collegiate environment, 2)increased understanding of self and others, 3)increased understanding of diversity, and 4)exploration of career and calling.
    May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • CP 252 - College Transitions and Success for Transfers

    Credits 1
    The Transfer Seminar seeks to encourage and facilitate a successful transition to Fresno Pacific University. By better understanding themselves, others, and their fields of study, students will be motivated to explore how their talents and abilities might benefit others locally, regionally, and globally.

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRIM 210 - Criminal Justice Administration

    Credits 3
    Explores the history and purpose of criminal justice administration agencies, with particular emphasis on a review of organization and structure of federal, state and local enforcement agencies; organization and function of the courts; interplay of probation, parole, restorative justice and victim services; and overview of penology and prison administration.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 220 - Criminal Law

    Credits 3
    Basic introduction to substantive criminal law, examining nature, origins and purposes of criminal law and general principles of criminal liability. Analysis of substantive elements of crime, including act and mental state, defenses, justifications, participatory parties and review of specific substantive crimes.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 350 - Theories of Criminology

    Credits 3
    This course surveys the various theories of the causes of crime, exploring sociological, biological and psychological explanations and schools of criminology. It also explains biblical perspectives on evil and the causes of delinquent behavior in our society.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 352 - Criminology

    Credits 3
    A study of types of crime, sociological, biological, psychological, cultural, economic and political explanations for crime, and various schools of criminology.
  
  • CRIM 355 - Victimology

    Credits 3
    This course introduces the student to an overview of victimization and trauma, cycles of violence and recovery processes. Covers victimological, restorative, coping and healing concepts used to deal with the challenges victims face in a range of settings: the criminal justice system, natural disasters, war and other kinds of violence and situations involving the abuse of power.
    Faculty consent required. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 360 - Criminal Procedure

    Credits 3
    This course focuses on the interplay between the Bill of Rights and the criminal justice system, with particular emphasis on the application of fundamental rights of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confession, as well as, procedures and limitations prior to trial, during trial and post-conviction.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 362 - Criminal Procedure

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120   Recommended prior course work: PS-120. Acquaints students with laws of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confession, procedure prior to and during trial, postconviction procedures, and limitations on criminal prosecutions and juvenile proceedings. Rules of evidence as they apply to the admissibility of behavioral, forensic and other types of evidence are examined, as well. Throughout the course specific attention is given to how the Bill of Rights endeavors to guarantee justice through the procedures of the criminal justice system and the extent to which it does so. The impact of the restorative justice movement on criminal procedures is also explored.
  
  • CRIM 370 - Diversity and Crime

    Credits 3
    This course looks at the challenge of cultural and gender diversity in criminology. It explores the impact of gender and race on criminal justice personnel, victims and offenders. It provides an overview of cultural proficiency in human relations. Finally, it pays special attention to the impact of bias on service delivery and system responsiveness.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 372 - Diversity and Crime

    Credits 3
    This course looks at the challenge of cultural and gender diversity in Criminology. It explores the impact of gender and race on criminal justice personnel, victims, and offenders. It provides an overview of cultural proficiency in human relations. Finally, it pays special attention on the impact of bias on service delivery and system responsiveness.
  
  • CRIM 375 - Criminal Justice in America

    Credits 4
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120  PS 380  PSY 120  SOC 120   Recommended prior coursework: PS-120, PS-380, PSY-120 and SOC-120. A society says much about its value system by the way it treats those members who have violated the accepted standards of behavior. This course acquaints students with the American criminal law system, exposes them to its mode of operation through literature and field examination, invites them to assess the justice of its processes and decisions and encourages a particular concern for the latter.
  
  • CRIM 382 - Juvenile Delinquency and Justice

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PSY-120 and SOC-120. A study of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. Attention is given to the portrait of delinquency, causal factors, agencies of justice, the correctional process, programs for control and prevention and a restorative justice perspective.
  
  • CRIM 390 - Corrections

    Credits 3
    Provides the student with an overview of the history and the trends of adult and juvenile corrections, including probation and parole. Focuses on legal issues, specific laws, general operations of corrections and relationship between corrections and other components of the judicial system. Correctional philosophies, theories and practices, including restorative justice, are discussed.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • CRIM 392 - Corrections

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120  PSY 120  SOC 120   Recommended prior course work: PS-120, PSY-120, SOC-120. Provides the student with an overview of the history and the trends of corrections, including probation and parole. Focuses on legal issues, general operations of corrections and relationship between corrections and other components of the criminal justice system. Correctional philosophies, theories and practices, including restorative justice, are discussed. Introduces various employment opportunities available within the correctional system to students.
  
  • CRIM 410 - Criminal Evidence

    Credits 3
    This course provides a general overview of the origin, philosophy and constitutional basis for the law of evidence, with particular attention to discovery, chain of evidence, preservation & spoliation, rules governing admissibility, relevancy, hearsay rule and its exceptions, opinion, privilege and scientific evidence.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 412 - Restorative Justice

    Credits 3
    Students examine assumptions about crime and justice. Retributive and restorative paradigms of justice are compared and contrasted. Programs and crime prevention and intervention strategies are evaluated to discern retributive and restorative position and outcome effectiveness.
    May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 420 - Criminology Statistics

    Credits 3
    Research and statistics are important in criminology. Specific statistical information covered in the course includes identifying and measuring objectives, collecting data, working with significance levels, analyzing variance and interpreting crime statistics.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 422 - Statistics for Sociology and Criminology

    Credits 3
    Research and statistics are important in criminology. Specific statistical information covered in the course includes identifying and measuring objectives, collecting data, working with significance levels, analyzing variance and interpreting crime statistics.
  
  • CRIM 440 - Advanced Criminal Law

    Credits 3
    This course is a follow-up to Criminal Procedure. It explores additional problems with arrest, search and seizure, as well as the role of the law of evidence on disposition of cases in the juvenile and adult justice systems.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 476 - Internship

    Credits 3
    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a "real world" setting. The course is also designed to teach students effective professional communication, leadership, relational and critical thinking skills. Through the internship experience, students will clarify their career goals, develop professional skills and reflect on how their work life integrates with their faith.
    Faculty consent required. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • CRIM 486 - Topics: Criminology

    Credits 1 - 3
  
  • CRIM 496A - Criminology and Restorative Justice Studies Project I

    Credits 1
    This course will be the culminating work of the program that requires students to a) identify a particular issue or problem that commonly occurs in the workplace (or from their study), and b) apply selected disciplinary theory and program principles that are relevant to models for constructive conflict management or transformation.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 496B - Criminology and Restorative Justice Studies Project II

    Credits 1
    This course will be the culminating work of the program that requires students to a) identify a particular issue or problem that commonly occurs in the workplace (or from their study), and b) apply selected disciplinary theory and program principles that are relevant to models for constructive conflict management or transformation.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CRIM 496C - Criminology and Restorative Justice Studies Project III

    Credits 1
    This course will be the culminating work of the program that requires students to a) identify a particular issue or problem that commonly occurs in the workplace (or from their study), and b) apply selected disciplinary theory and program principles that are relevant to models for constructive conflict management or transformation.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.

Computer Science Software Engineering

  
  • CSSE 105 - Computer Literacy

    Credits 3
    Prepares students for success in the challenging, educational and workplace technological environment. This foundational study assists students in mastering fundamental computer hardware and software skills, including the Microsoft Office productivity suite. Students access and utilize common Internet-based technologies and applications found in the workplace and in higher education. Students become familiar with terminology associated with current technology. The course covers computer benefits and risks, communication, collaboration, and the social aspects of computers.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 112 - Survey of Computer Science

    Credits 3
    Introduction to computer organization, low and high level computer language, various computer applications, software, hardware, operating systems and networks. The fundamentals of software development, project management, and ethical responsibility are also presented.
    May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 220 - Programming for Solving Problems

    Credits 4
    Recommended prior course work: CSSE 112   Developing and designing computer programs to solve computing problems. Content is presented in the context of a programming language, its development and execution to solve practical applications, structure, and manipulation of data via objects.
    May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 230 - Computer Architecture and Digital Design

    Credits 2
    Computer systems/fundamentals, including CPU hardware, memory, instruction set and addressing via assembly language. An introduction to parallel processing is also included. Topics in digital design, including Boolean and combinational logic are presented.
    May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 240 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    Credits 4
    Nonlinear data structures and their use in algorithms. Analysis of algorithms and use of stacks, queues, trees, sets, and graphs. Building upon these fundamentals, an emphasis placed on design and implementation.
    May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 260 - Software Modeling and Analysis

    Credits 3
    The use of various types of models as semi-formal or completely formal descriptions of system structure and behavior. Analysis of implementations with respect to their models for consistency, completeness, and correctness. Recommended prior coursework: MATH-370
    May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 310 - Programming Languages

    3
    Introduction to programming languages, including object-oriented and functional designs, basic type systems, language translation and execution, and abstraction. Concepts in parallel and distributed computing are addressed along with fundamentals, decomposition, communication and coordination, and algorithms and analysis.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 220 and CSSE 240 .
  
  • CSSE 336 - Operating Systems and Networks

    Credits 2
    A background of modern operating systems and their control of computing operations is presented. Included are topics in memory management, file systems, I/O systems. Also incorporated are topics in computer networking communication, including hardware and software concepts of protocol, control, and security.
    May not be audited.
  
  • CSSE 350 - Software Engineering

    3
    Introduction to engineering software as part of a process including requirements, specification, planning, design, verification testing, quality assurance, troubleshooting, and maintenance. Cost estimation is also included as an emphasis.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 240 .
  
  • CSSE 352 - Software Design

    3
    The architecture and design of software systems for large and complex applications. Different architectures and corresponding tradeoffs to be considered in decision-making involved in design. System modelling and simulation are used to assess design decisions.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 350 .
  
  • CSSE 362 - Multimedia Design & Development

    3
    Principles in the design and development of multimedia including color theory, layout, and typography in digital media. Application of these aspects in computing and programming is a main focus.
  
  • CSSE 366 - Computer Game Design & Development

    3
    A study of the scientific, technological, and artistic aspects of computer game design. Topics include modelling and simulation, human-computer interaction, graphic design, scripting, and story themes.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 240 .
  
  • CSSE 370 - Internet Programming

    3
    Solving problems with Internet and World Wide Web programming and related systems. Application of Internet programming languages in practical contexts with HTML and JavaScript. The course also examines Internet application tools and commercial Web servers and their security.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 240 .
  
  • CSSE 372 - Web/Mobile Applications Development

    3
    A study of the technologies utilized in the design, development, and deployment of software applications for web and mobile platforms. Topics include designing client/server applications for users, database implementation, usability, and security.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 220.
  
  • CSSE 378 - Programmable Logic Controller Programming

    3
    Programming and applications of programmable logic controllers. The course includes an introduction to the hardware and software aspects of PLC programming and its applications.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 230  and CSSE 240 .
  
  • CSSE 380 - Database Systems and Programming

    3
    Designing and developing relational databases in SQL to solve problems and creating forms, reports, and other components to assist data analysis and manipulation efforts. Topics include queries, joins, views, indexing, sequences, and security.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 112 , CSSE 240  and MATH 370 .
  
  • CSSE 390 - Ethics in Software Engineering

    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: CSSE 112 . The social and ethical issues in computing and software development including its history, promoting a dedication to quality, security, and privacy. A focus on codes of ethics is also included.
  
  • CSSE 455 - Software Quality Assurance

    3
    Testing methods, verification, and validation of software to ensure its performance and adherence to customer specifications. Evaluation strategies, test planning, and methods for component and system-level emphases to ensure quality software products.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 350 .
  
  • CSSE 457 - Software Project Management

    3
    Development of software projects and related processes, including an emphasis on their evaluation and selection, scope, planning, organizing, staffing, scheduling, and monitoring. A focus is also included on managing risk in the development process.
    Prerequisite: CSSE 350 .
  
  • CSSE 480 - Computing Projects in the Community

    1 Unit
    Students work in conjunction with a project coordinator to identify a need in society (e.g. school or district, church, etc.) to help address a computing need. All assignments must be approved by project coordinator and students meet weekly to discuss their progress.
    Prerequisite (or Corequisite): CSSE 390  and CSSE 455 .
  
  • CSSE 490 - Senior Project

    1
    A cooperative experience with a member in local industry to address a programming need via a team-based project. Students work with project coordinator to discuss planning and implementation progress. Students are expected to submit a formal proposal for all work to be completed, which must be approved by project coordinator and client. Students will present on their experiences and results to the FPU community.
    Prerequisite (or Corequisite): CSSE 390 , CSSE 455  and CSSE 457 .

Early Childhood Development

  
  • ECD 300 - Child, Family and Community

    Credits 3
    Students will examine the systems and relationships among family, school and community and their impact on a child's development. Included are a study of ethnic diversity, social class, customs/heritage and gender roles on family behavior, values, morals, attitudes and the development of children.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 305 - Advanced Child Growth and Development

    Credits 3
    An advanced study of human development through a study of diverse cultural backgrounds. Professionals are provided a culturally sensitive account of developmental processes that assist their young students to develop the skills, understanding and sensitivity needed in a pluralistic society. From a multicultural perspective and a focus on typical and atypical child growth and development, the course includes studies in the cognitive, physical, social, cultural and emotional development of children from conception to age eight. Research, historical data, theories and recent trends are studied and applied through real-world case studies and applications.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 310 - Human Diversity and Relations

    Credits 3
    The purpose of this course is to expand the student's understanding of the influences of gender, culture, economic situation, learning styles and language on the socialization of children, and then how to use this new understanding to inform the way to program for and interact with children.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 400 - Children's Play and Learning Theory

    Credits 3
    This course examines child development theories as they relate to play and learning in young children. The course considers cultural and developmental perspectives, emphasizes theories in practice and provides a theoretical framework for structuring, observing, analyzing and evaluating play. Students will explore how children learn to play and the effect that play has on the child's development.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 420 - Guidance in Social and Emotional Behaviors

    Credits 3
    In this course, students examine how to promote an encouraging classroom environment through the study of specific developmental assets that integrate factors such as peer influence, values development and social skills. The short and long term effects of logical and natural consequences for pro-social development are reviewed.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 430 - Early Childhood Physical Education Methods

    Credits 3
    Through this course students will explore movement and developmentally appropriate practices for early childhood physical education. Adaptations for children with exceptionalities will also be presented.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 440 - Students with Exceptionalities in School and Community

    Credits 3
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the information and techniques needed to develop curricula and instruction to meet the unique needs of individual children in early childhood settings. Special emphasis is given to theories, research and practical application from the fields of both early childhood education and special education.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 450 - Children's Art and Literature

    Credits 3
    This course will introduce the student to a diverse selection of children's literature. Students will explore methods and strategies for using children's literature to engage the young learner in multiple learning experiences. A full integration across the curriculum will be a focus as children's literature is directly tied to math, science, social studies and the arts.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 460 - Math and Science for Young Children

    Credits 3
    Designed from a constructivist focus, this course will integrate math and science learning experiences for the young child. Moving young learners from real-world/concrete experiences to organizing, recording and discovering what they know and understand and what they still wonder about.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 470 - Curriculum Development for Early Childhood Education

    Credits 3
    General overview of curriculum design for early childhood programs to include planning, preparation, implementation, evaluation of curricular activities, designing a classroom, lesson planning and the use of observation to guide curriculum and assessment. Developmentally appropriate practices will be a focus through exploration of content across the curriculum. Preparation of a professional portfolio will cap the learning experience.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 483 - Child Observation Practicum

    Credits 3
    This is the second section of this course in which students reflect and apply learning from multiple courses in the child development program. Through readings, reflection on observations and practice, students will synthesize the information presented during this second semester of course offerings.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECD 484 - Child Observation Methods

    Credits 3
    This course will focus on a unique system for observing and recording the development of children ages 3 to 5 in early childhood classroom settings. It is based on a progression of children's skill development in six major areas including: emotional, social, physical, cognitive, language, and creative expression. Each of these aspects will be studied further by dividing them into specific areas: self-esteem and emotional development, social play and prosocial behavior, large and small motor development, cognitive development, spoken language and emergent literacy, and art skills and imagination. Connections will be made to the CLASS Observation Tool in three Domains: Emotional support, Classroom organization, and Instructional support.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.

Economics

  
  • ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics

    Credits 3
    An introduction to microeconomics. Topics generally include supply, demand and equilibrium; opportunity cost and scarcity; consumer theory; costs and profit maximization by firms; competition; effects of government policies such as price ceilings, price floors and taxes; and the way various markets operate, such as markets for labor, consumer products and loanable funds.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECON 101H - Principles of Microeconomics

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-140. An introduction to microeconomics. Topics generally include supply, demand and equilibrium; opportunity cost and scarcity; consumer theory; costs and profit maximization by firms; competition; effects of government policies such as price ceilings, price floors and taxes; and the way various markets operate, such as markets for labor, consumer products and loanable funds. Emphasis on the quantitative models of problem-solving skills. Students are required to identify an economic issue to explore as their research topic and present their findings and possible policy changes to resolve the issues to an evaluative committee.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    Credits 3
    An introduction to macroeconomics. Topics include supply, demand and equilibrium; economic growth and the international distribution of income; unemployment, inflation and aggregate demand and supply; the monetary system and the role of the Federal Reserve; government spending, taxation and fiscal policy as a means of managing the macroeconomy; and topics of current economic interest.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECON 102H - Principles of Macroeconomics

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-140. An introduction to macroeconomics. Topics include supply, demand and equilibrium; economic growth and the international distribution of income; unemployment, inflation and aggregate demand and supply; the monetary system and the role of the Federal Reserve; government spending, taxation and fiscal policy as a means of managing the macroeconomy; and topics of current economic interest. Emphasis on the quantitative models of problem-solving skills. Students are required to identify an economic issue to explore as their research topic and present their findings and possible policy changes to resolve the issues to an evaluation committee.
    May not be audited.
  
  • ECON 301 - Economics in Business

    Credits 3
    This class is a study in allocating scarce resources in order to achieve managerial objectives.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • ECON 390 - Global Economics and Sustainable Development

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: GEOG-220. The increasing interconnectedness of the global economy affects people more profoundly today than ever before. This course helps students better profoundly understand and wrestle with some significant positive and negative aspects of the globalization process, as well as examine social, political and economic aspects of development and the varied impact of the development process on the world today.
  
  • ECON 392 - Introduction to the Global Economy

    Credits 1
    Examines the basics of how the global economy operates and how it has come to be this way. Uses layman's language to explain the fundamentals of the global economy, including issues of trade, debt, globalization and inequality.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • ECON 440 - Managerial Economics

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: ECON-105. Students learn how to apply economic theory to real business problems. Market forecasting, business decision making, cost analysis, government regulations and quantitative models for capital investment are explored.

Education

  
  • ED 300 - Diversity and Global Education

    1 Unit
    Explores the need and the methods of educating with a global perspective that focuses on understanding cultural differences and increasing sensitivity to those who are different from oneself. The benefits of understanding, celebrating and teaching diversity and a global perspective will be highlighted, as well as ways to combat misinformation and stereotypical attitudes about others in the classroom and the workplace.
    Degree completion students only; May not be audited; Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course.
  
  • ED 410 - Comparative Studies in Education: Canada

    1 Unit
    Explores the methods and perspectives of Canadian education with a focus on understanding educational differences with American/Central Valley public education. The benefits of exploring diverse methods and perspectives in teaching and learning is highlighted.
    Degree completion students only; May not be audited

Environmental Studies

  
  • ENV 150 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

    Credits 4
    An interdisciplinary study of the relationships between people and their environment. The use of natural resources, environmental degradation and human population are examined from ecological, social and religious perspectives.
  
  • ENV 151 - The Environment and Humanity

    Credits 3
    This course explores the interaction between humans and the natural environment from an interdisciplinary perspective involving ecological, social and religious issues. Use of natural resources and environmental damage are central themes.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • ENV 286 - Topics in Environmental Science

    Credits 1 - 4
  
  • ENV 460 - Environmental Issue Analysis

    Credits 1 - 3
    Interdisciplinary analysis of a selected environmental issue.
    Faculty consent required. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • ENV 482 - Environmental Studies Practicum

    Credits 1 - 3
    Supervised work in an approved organization, such as a planning agency or nonprofit group involved with environmental issues.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • ENV 486 - Topics in Environmental Science

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.

English as A Second Language

  
  • ESL 005 - Test Preparation I

    Credits: 0
    Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory This non-credit course meets three hours per week and focuses on each skill area tested in the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) for students with beginning and intermediate English proficiency as determined by the IELP placement exam or TOEFL score. Practice TOEFL tests, as well as the institutional TOEFL, are administered each semester.
    May not be audited
  
  • ESL 006 - Test Preparation II

    Credits: 0
    Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory This non-credit course meets three hours per week and focuses on each skill area tested in the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) for students with advanced English proficiency as determined by the IELP placement exam or TOEFL score. Practice TOEFL tests, as well as the institutional TOEFL, are administered each semester.
    May not be audited
 

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