Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 
    
    May 24, 2024  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Psychology

  
  • PSY 340 - Psychological Assessment

    Credits 4
    An introduction to psychometric theory and psychological assessment, with special attention given to how tests are developed, validated, and applied. Students are introduced to how psychologists assess constructs, and to the major testing domains in psychology (e.g., intelligence, personality, clinical psychology, neuropsychology, education). Students conduct a research project involving the development and administration of a psychometrically sound test.
  
  • PSY 350 - Child Development

    Credits 3
    A study of the development of the child from conception to adolescence. Topics of development, such as physical, intellectual, social, emotional and moral are studied.
  
  • PSY 351 - Child Growth and Development

    Credits 3
    This course will focus on child growth and development from both classic and current theory and the effect that research has on our understanding of this complex field of study. The joint contributions of biology and environment to the developing child (birth through age ten) and his/her family will be examined throughout the course. Real-world situations will be studied and discussed as they pertain to the developing child and those who provide services including care, support and education. Illustrations and distinctions will be made as they address commonalities and differences between ethnic groups, cultures and traditions, with particular attention to our Central Valley and policy/programming issues that are crucial for safeguarding children and their families.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 352 - Advanced Child Growth and Development

    Credits 3
    This course is an advanced study of human development through a study of diverse cultural backgrounds. Professionals are provided a culturally sensitive account of developmental processes that will assist their young students to develop the skills, understanding and sensitivity needed in a pluralistic society. Included are advanced studies in the cognitive, physical, social, cultural and emotional development of children from conception to age eight from a multicultural perspective and a focus on typical and atypical child growth and development. Research, historical data, theories and recent trends are studied and applied through real-world case studies and applications.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 355 - Adolescent Development

    Credits 3
    The study of the development of the person from puberty to adulthood. Problems of adjustment during this period will also be studied.
  
  • PSY 360 - Life-Span Development

    Credits 3
    This course uses the life-span developmental perspective to integrate theory and research related to adult development and aging. Its emphasis is on life transitions and life events and the psychosocial functioning of the adult.
  
  • PSY 365 - Gerontology

    Credits 3
    Recommend taking PSY-360 prior to this course. The process of aging from social, psychological, cultural and spiritual perspectives. Examines the needs and strengths of the older generation and the resources available to serve them, the fastest growing segment of the population. Enriched by a wide variety of professional presenters, videos, field trips and lecture format.
  
  • PSY 370 - Cognitive Psychology

    Credits 4
    This course surveys the broad range of theories and research regarding cognitive psychology, covering such topics as perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, judgment and decision-making, pattern recognition, categorization, attitudes and consciousness.
  
  • PSY 375 - Biopsychology

    Credits 4
    The study of the biological aspects of behavior, with special attention paid to the structural and functional components of the central nervous system. Topics include the brain and spinal cord, neurons, the peripheral nervous system, right-left brain functions, neurological disorders, neurotransmitters, sexual behavior, sleep, ingestion, and brain imaging. Students participate in several labs using BIOPAC software.
  
  • PSY 376 - Human Sexuality

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PSY 120   Recommended prior coursework: PSY-120. Sexuality is central to our identity as human beings. This course introduces students to physiological, developmental and sociocultural factors in human sexuality. Students are exposed to a diversity of perspectives on sexuality, including evolutionary, theological, religious and political perspectives. It also covers attraction, arousal, orientation and sexual disorders. The primary objectives are for students to become more well-informed about their sexual identities, to evaluate how sexuality is depicted in the media and to understand issues about sexuality in the national discourse.
  
  • PSY 377 - Sport and Exercise Psychology

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120   Recommended prior coursework: PSY-120. An overview of fundamental psychological theory and its application to physical activity and sport. Topics covered focus on the interrelationships between physical activity and psychological variables, including personality, motivation, competitiveness, arousal, stress, anxiety, competition, reinforcement, intrinsic motivation, group and team dynamics, group cohesion, imagery, self-confidence, morality, goal-setting and concentration. In addition, the relationship between exercise and psychological well-being will be addressed.
  
  • PSY 380 - Behavioral Psychology

    Credits 4
    A study of the major principles and theories of learning. The practical application of learning to such areas as education, behavior control and modification and psychotherapy will be studied.
  
  • PSY 381 - Psychology of Learning

    Credits 3
    This course will introduce students to the major principles and theories of learning. The practical application of learning to such areas as education, behavior control and modification and psychotherapy will be studied.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 386 - Psychology: Living with Stress

    Credits 1
    Introduces students to the psychological factor of stress. Students learn the definition, sources, reactions and factors that influence stress. In addition coping strategies are discussed.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 390 - Group Dynamics and Leadership

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PSY 120   Recommended prior coursework: PSY-120. A study of the nature of group tasks, interpersonal relations in groups and group leadership. Provides a background of knowledge and experience helpful to the understanding of church groups, business and professional groups, educational groups and small groups in society generally.
  
  • PSY 395 - Social Psychology

    Credits 3
    The study of the social influences on human attitudes, personality, emotions, and behavior. This course introduces students to the major theories, research areas, and influential experiments in social psychology. It addresses topics such as cognitive dissonance, attributions, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, sociocultural influences, conflict resolution/peacemaking, beliefs/judgements, and group influences.
  
  • PSY 397 - Community Psychology

    Credits 4
    Explores the relationship between social systems and individual well-being in a community context. Students consider an array of social and mental health problems through the lenses of prevention, community-based intervention and community-based research.
    May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 400 - Personality

    Credits 3
    Major personality theories are studied together with practical application and topics that emerge from the theories. Theorists such as Freud, Jung, Adler, Erikson, Bandura, Rogers and Maslow are studied. Application topics include anger management, marriage adjustment and self-modification of behavior.
  
  • PSY 410 - Abnormal Psychology

    Credits 4
    This course focuses on the etiology, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders, as well as on the latest findings in the discipline. Students are introduced to how scientists define abnormality, cultural aspects of mental illness and what disorders are most common in our society. Ideal for students interested in preparing for more clinically or therapeutically oriented studies or professions. Also ideal for students entering helping professions, for which awareness of issues affecting troubled people is helpful.
  
  • PSY 411 - Abnormal Psychology

    Credits 3
    This course focuses on the etiology, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders, as well as, on the latest findings in this complex and rapidly changing field. Students are introduced to how scientists define abnormality, cultural aspects of mental illness, and what disorders are most common in our society. This course has value for students entering the helping professions, for which awareness of issues affecting troubled people is helpful.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 420 - Childhood Disabilities and Psychopathology

    Credits 4
    The nature and treatment of common emotional and behavioral problems of children and adolescents. Topics such as psychosomatic disorders, autism, childhood schizophrenia, mental retardation, brain damage in children and learning disabilities will be studied. Child rearing approaches, family therapy and methods of assessment of problems will also be studied.
  
  • PSY 430 - Adult Development and Life Planning

    Credits: 4
    The emphasis in module one is on the experiential nature of nontraditional education and adult development theory. Students will become familiar with various theories and instruments that provide a cognitive basis for personal analysis and understanding. The objective of the module is personal discovery and affirmation through examination of one's strengths and the subsequent adjustments that may assist areas of personal growth.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 440 - Counseling

    Credits 4
    This course is a study of the principles and practices of counseling individuals and of guiding them toward life's goals. It seeks to develop counselor self-awareness and beginning skills in interviewing and problem solving. Laboratory components include role playing, case studies and other simulation experiences.
  
  • PSY 441 - Introduction to Counseling Theories

    Credits 3
    This course is designed to introduce students to the various theoretical components of counseling. Contemporary psychological theories are presented. The course will provide an introduction to interviewing and to individual and group counseling skills. Laboratory components include experiential activities, role playing, case studies and other simulation experiences.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 450 - History and Systems of Psychology

    Credits 4
    This course covers the history of psychology and can be divided into three main sections: 1) the centuries leading up to the founding of psychology in 1879, ranging from ancient philosophy to 19th century studies in physiology 2) the founding of psychology as a laboratory science and its early and most influential theorists, and 3) psychology's explosive growth in the 20th century and recent developments and applications.
  
  • PSY 460 - Psychology of Religion

    Credits 3
    This course introduces students to the major theories, experiments, and current research topics in the psychology of religion. It covers topics such as religious development, conversion, religious experiences, benefits, research methods, dimensions of religion, behaviors, and the relationship between neurophysiology and the brain. Special attention is given to the scientific study of religion and the philosophy of science.
  
  • PSY 471 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

    Credits 4
    Recommended prior coursework: PSY 397  PSY 410   Provides students with the opportunity to view psychology from a cross-cultural lens. Psychological research and practice is examined and critiqued from a non-Western socio-cultural perspective. Students will also become familiar with how ethnocentrism, privilege, and bias impact our understanding and interaction with people from cultures different than our own.
    May not be audited.
  
  • PSY 482 - Psychology Practicum

    Credits 2 - 4
    Supervised work in an approved organization such as juvenile detention homes, mental hospitals, schools, youth work, etc. Limited to juniors and seniors who are psychology majors. Thirty hours of service required for 1 unit of course credit. A minimum of 3 units must be taken to count as a full psychology course.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • PSY 483 - Mediation Practicum

    Credits 1
    An opportunity for intensive training in mediation leading to a supervised experience in mediating actual conflicts. The practical component may be completed with the Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP) or other appropriate mediation programs, or the student may arrange to mediate an informal dispute situation approved by the instructor.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • PSY 484 - Psychology Practicum: Costa Rica

    Credits 4
    This course is offered to students participating in the Costa Rica semester study abroad program with Students International. Students work at one of the several ministry sites in Costa Rica at the arrangement of the instructor.
    Faculty consent required. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • PSY 485 - Integration Symposium

    Credits 3
    Addresses topics relevant to the integration of psychology and theology. Participants attend Fuller Theological Seminary's annual Integration Symposium and hear several speakers whose presentations revolve around a specific theme. Students increase their awareness of the latest research into integrative studies, have opportunities to meet and dialogue with conference speakers and meet regularly with the instructor(s) to expand upon themes presented at the conference. Students write a culminating paper, reviewing and sharing the implications of the research presented at the conference.
    Faculty consent required. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • PSY 486 - Topics in Psychology

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • PSY 495 - Psychology Research Project

    Credits 1 - 4
    Psychology majors engage in specialized research under the supervision of a psychology faculty member. Minimum 30-120 hours research, including literature review, feedback/discussion with faculty member and submission of a final summary report. Time requirement depends on the number of registered units.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • PSY 496 - Psychological Research Practicum

    Credits 1 - 4
    Involves student participation in a research project headed by the instructor. Students develop their knowledge concerning how to conduct various aspects of a research study. Students are selected through an application process and must apply for the practicum with the psychology program director. A minimum of 3 units must be taken to count as a full psychology course.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.

Religious Studies

  
  • REL 300 - Multifaith Exchange

    Credits 1
    This is a class in which a student participates in one semester of The Fresno Multifaith Exchange Program and writes reflectively on each session. Students must attend the Sunday afternoon sessions and site visits to various religious centers in Fresno.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • REL 320 - Introduction to Mennonite Arts

    Credits 4
    This interdisciplinary course includes contemporary and historical Mennonite expressions of poetry, music, art, fiction and drama. The course will also offer opportunities for original creative expressions of students in the arts.
  
  • REL 350 - Interfaith Scholar Weekend

    Credits 1
    This course provides an opportunity for students to learn from an established scholar of religion in an interfaith setting. The Interfaith Scholar Weekend is an annual even in Fresno.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • REL 405 - Philosophy of Religion

    Credits 3
    Study in the nature and validity of religious ideas.
  
  • REL 418 - Culture, Religion and the Church

    Credits 3
    This course will explore the religious history, traditions and thought of major cultural groups in Central California, with particular attention to the history, teachings and practices of the Christian church in these cultures.
  
  • REL 452 - World Christianity

    Credits 3
    This course investigates the diverse forms, practices, and theologies of Christianity in various regions around the world. Attention is given to the various ways in which Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant, and Pentecostal churches uniquely reflect and relate to the broader cultures around them.
  
  • REL 455 - Christians and Religious Neighbors

    Credits 3
    How should Christians interact with people from other religions? What does it mean to follow Jesus in and among non-Christian communities? This class investigates theologies of religion, models of interfaith engagement and ways in which some Christ-followers contextualize their faith in relation to and in the midst of non-Christian religious communities. In particular students practice dialogue skills in an effort to better understand what it means to love religious neighbors as a reflection of Christ's love.
  
  • REL 460 - Religions of the World

    Credits 3
    This course introduces students to the study of religion and to many of the diverse religious traditions in the world today. The course begins with a broad overview, investigating sacred texts, as well as regional, historical, cultural and social elements of various religious traditions, and then explores a few particular religions more deeply, using themes in religious studies.
  
  • REL 465 - Religions of India

    Credits 3
    This course will provide insights into particular expressions of Indian religions, the ways in which these conflict and influence each other, and various Indian Christian responses and reflections on these religions.
    May not be audited.
  
  • REL 486 - Topics in Religion

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.

Russian Language Studies

  
  • RUS 100 - Elementary Russian I

    Credits 4
    This course is designed for people with little or no knowledge of Russian. The purpose of the course is to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening ability at a basic functional level in Russian. Classes will be conducted primarily in Russian.
    May not be audited.

Sociology

  
  • SOC 120 - Introduction to Sociology

    Credits 3
    An introduction to the principles and theoretical perspectives of sociology and their application to the fundamental problems of social life. A practical component consisting of experiences, observations and exercises in the local environment is included, as well. The course will focus on Western/American society, examining the effects of groups, organizations, cultures and institutions on human behavior.
  
  • SOC 121 - Introduction to Sociology

    Credits 3
    An introduction to the principles and theoretical perspectives of sociology and their application to the fundamental problems of social life. A practical component consisting of experiences, observations, and exercises in the local environment is included. The course will focus on Western/American society, examining the effects of groups, organizations, cultures, and institutions on human behavior.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SOC 164 - Cultural Studies: Canada

    Credits 1
    Overview of the methods and strategies used in cultural studies, using an interdisciplinary approach to analyze how culture influences individuals in society. Observations in three Canadian cities enhance understanding of Canadian and transnational culture. Comparison with American and Central Valley cultures.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SOC 205 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    Credits 3
    Analyzes major ideas and approaches to the study of cultures around the world.
  
  • SOC 286 - Topics in Sociology

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SOC 301 - Anthropology for Christian Witness

    Credits 3
    Presents anthropological perspectives and principles for cross-cultural ministry. Students develop skills for researching and interacting among diverse cultural and social groups.
  
  • SOC 320 - Cultural Studies: Mexico

    Credits 1
    Presents an introductory overview of methods and strategies used in cultural studies, using an interdisciplinary approach to analyze how culture influences individuals in society. Observations in three cities in Mexico enhance understanding of Mexican culture and of transnational (global) culture, and their comparison with American culture.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SOC 332 - Modern Africa: History, Politics and Culture

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: GEOG-220, HIST-120, HIST-130. Modern Sub-Saharan Africa remains a mystery to many people in the West today. This course will help unpack the mystery of Sub-Saharan Africa's rich history and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. Special emphasis will be given to the colonial and post-colonial history, politics, and culture of Nigeria, the Congo, Kenya and South Africa.
  
  • SOC 334 - Modern Asia: History, Politics and Culture

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: GEOG 220  HIST 120  HIST 130   Recommended prior coursework: GEOG-220, HIST-120, HIST-130. The experience of Asia in the colonial and post-colonial era will be studied with an eye towards understanding its unique character as an important region of the world today. The countries of China and India will be used as case studies to better understand and interpret important currents that run through Asian history and shape its contemporary politics and culture.
  
  • SOC 336 - Modern Middle East: History, Politics and Culture

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: GEOG 220  HIST 120  HIST 130   Recommended prior coursework: GEOG-220, HIST-120, HIST-130. The Middle East is a region many in the West today view with apprehension and hostility. This course will examine the historical, cultural and political forces from the 19th and 20th centuries that have made the region what it is today. Special emphasis will be given to understanding contemporary Islamic and Jewish politics and culture, as well as ways the West has interacted with the Middle East over the past century.
  
  • SOC 338 - People and Cultures of Costa Rica

    Credits 3
    "Pura vida" (pure life or full life) is a common phrase used in many contexts in Costa Rica. In this class students explore the pura vida of Costa Rican culture with special attention given to the history, politics and religion of this Central American nation, along with issues of race, immigration, class and family relationships that are unique to the country. Course sessions are led by Costa Ricans with expertise in each of these areas and students make visits to various sites of cultural significance.
    May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SOC 345 - Contemporary Issues in Immigration

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: SOC 120   Utilizes a critical lens to examine immigration in the United States, with a specific focus on contemporary Latin American immigration. A cross-national approach is taken in order to better understand the impact of migration on families, communities and countries. Also examined are the tensions and complexities surrounding topics such as undocumented migration, child migration, and U.S. immigration policy and reform. This course will explore the theological implications of immigration as well as reflect an Anabaptist commitment to justice. Recommended prior coursework: SOC-120
  
  • SOC 346 - Human Trafficking: Perspectives and Interventions

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: SOC 120   An introductory understanding regarding the issues surrounding human trafficking and at-risk children. In addition will analyze the various responses and strategies employed by Christian and governmental organizations in addressing trafficking and exploitation, and the pathways for informed action and advocacy for trafficked and exploited persons. Recommended prior coursework: SOC-120
  
  • SOC 350 - Marriage and Family

    Credits 3
    An introduction to marriage and family as both a social institution and a system of interaction patterns. The family life cycle from marriage through death, including martial relations, divorce, parenting, abuse, mate selection and changing patterns of family life, is examined.
  
  • SOC 351 - Marriage and the Family

    Credits 3
    An introduction to marriage and family as both a social institution and a system of interaction patterns. The family life cycle from marriage through death, including marital relations, divorce, parenting, abuse, mate selection and changing patterns of family life is examined.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SOC 360 - Sociology of Religion

    Credits 3
    A study of the social dimension of religious experiences, movements and institutions, along with the personal and social significance of religious phenomena.
  
  • SOC 364 - World Christianity

    Credits 3
    This course investigates the diverse forms, practices, and theologies of Christianity in various regions around the world. Attention is given to the various ways in which Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant, and Pentecostal churches uniquely reflect and relate to the broader cultures around them.
  
  • SOC 370 - Media and Society

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM 120   Recommended prior coursework: COM-120. A study of mass media (television, radio, newspaper, etc.) as a social/communication force in American culture. Attention is given to media use by the church, as well as to such significant social/psychological problems as violence and sex in the media.
  
  • SOC 372 - Juvenile Delinquency and Justice

    Credits 3
    A study of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. Attention is given to the portrait of delinquency, causal factors, agencies of justice, the correctional process, programs for control and prevention and a restorative justice perspective.
  
  • SOC 375 - Organizational Behavior

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: MGT 350   Recommended prior coursework: MGT-350. A study of group dynamics conflict resolution and organizational control; theories of work, motivation and leadership; human differences, cross-cultural analyses of managerial processes and management of human resources.
  
  • SOC 400 - Social Psychology

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: SOC 120   The study of the social influences on human attitudes, personality, emotions, and behavior. This course introduces students to the major theories, research areas, and influential experiments in social psychology. It addresses topics such as cognitive dissonance, attributions, persuasion, conformity, prejudice, aggression, sociocultural influences, conflict resolution/peacemaking, beliefs/judgements, and group influences.
  
  • SOC 410 - American Ethnicity and Pluralism

    Credits 3
    A study of the history of immigration, racism, discrimination and assimilation in American society. The experiences of various ethnic groups in America from the nation's founding to the present are examined and the rise of pluralism as the current model for structuring ethnic diversity in American institutional life is explored. SOC 482 must be taken simultaneously if this course is being used to meet a focus series requirement.
  
  • SOC 430 - Conflict Management and Resolution

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM 120   Recommended prior coursework: COM-120. A study of the nature of human conflict and approaches to its management, resolution and transformation. This course focuses on the generic characteristics evident in most human conflict and surveys a variety of interdisciplinary approaches for understanding and responding constructively to conflict in interpersonal, intergroup and international settings.
  
  • SOC 440 - Lifecourse Development

    Credits 3
    An introduction to development as a lifelong process. Changes in human behavior, personality competencies and social relations over the course of life are examined, as are historical, social-structural, demographic and contextual influences on human development.
  
  • SOC 442 - Social Gerontology

    Credits 3
    The study of the process of aging as it occurs within American culture. The impact of an increasingly aged population will also be explored, both on a social-psychological level and in terms of its impact upon the larger society. Other topics will include ageism, elderly abuse and Alzheimer's disease.
  
  • SOC 446 - Sociology of Gender

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: SOC 120   Recommended prior coursework: SOC-120. Sexuality and gender are central to our identity as human beings. This course introduces students to physiological, developmental and sociocultural factors in human sexuality and gender. Students are exposed to a diversity of perspectives on gender and sexuality, including evolutionary, theological, religious and political perspectives. The course also covers attraction, arousal, orientation and sexual disorders. The primary objectives are for students to become more well-informed about their gender and sexual identities, to evaluate how these are depicted in the media and to understand issues about gender and sexuality in the national discourse.
  
  • SOC 450 - Social Problems and Public Policy

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120  PSY 120   Recommended prior coursework: ECON-105, PS-120, PSY-120, SOC-120. Poverty, sexism, racism, crime, drug abuse and family breakup are examples of major social problems that increasingly concern society. At the same time, government's responsibility to deal with these social problems has become widely expected. This course acquaints students with the major social problems that have emerged in recent years, and familiarizes them with the social policies that government has devised in an attempt to alleviate or remedy those problems. In so doing, it seeks to stimulate a concern about the justice and equity of such policies on individuals and groups in our society.
  
  • SOC 461 - Introduction to Social Science Research

    Credits 3
    An introduction to qualitative and quantitative research methodologies; participant observation, survey, ethnography and secondary data analysis; organization and interpretation of data; and reading social research.
  
  • SOC 470 - Sociocultural Theory

    Credits 3
    An introduction to the major theoretical perspectives and schools of thought within sociology. Theorists to be studied include Marx, Weber, Durkheim and contemporary theorists. Linkages between classical and contemporary sociological theory will be examined, as well as the application of these theories to students' lives and current social issues.
  
  • SOC 476 - Internship

    Credits 3
    In-depth, integrative field-service experience. In addition to a valuable service to constituents, provides a focused, consistent context for service and reflection. Requires evidence of learning through a portfolio compilation and a presentation of program impact.
    Faculty consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • SOC 480 - Senior Thesis

    Credits 3
    The integration and synthesis of knowledge gained from major coursework. A research project is undertaken applying and demonstrating knowledge of theory and research principles. The ethical ramifications of student work, as well as the implications of Christian values, are explored.
  
  • SOC 481 - International Internship

    Credits 3
    An intensive semester-long experience connected with various FPU semester study abroad programs. Students are immersed in the local culture and involved with a hands on ministry and guided by a mentor.
    May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SOC 482 - Intercultural Practicum

    Credits 1
    This practicum experience involves working as a volunteer in a local group in a group other than one's own. Orientation, on-going reflection and final debriefing are included in this experience. Living with a cultural host family or in an apartment or house within a cultural community may also be an option for some practicum experiences. Must be taken in conjunction with SOC-310 or 410 when those courses are used to meet a focus series requirement.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • SOC 483 - Mediation Practicum

    Credits 1
    An opportunity for intensive training in mediation leading to a supervised experience in mediating actual conflicts. The practical component may be completed with the Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP) or other appropriate mediation programs, or the student may arrange to mediate an informal dispute situation approved by the instructor.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SOC 486 - Topics in Sociology

    Credits 3
    Repeatable for credit.

Spanish Language Studies

  
  • SPAN 100 - Elementary Spanish I

    Credits 4
    This course is designed for people with little or no knowledge of Spanish. The purpose of the course is to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening ability at a basic functional level in Spanish. The course will give special attention to topics and tasks relevant for teaching in public schools. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPAN 105 - Elementary Spanish II

    Credits 4
    This course is structured for students who have completed an introductory course in Spanish (or have demonstrated proficiency in elementary Spanish). While communication in speaking and writing will be emphasized, all aspects of basic grammar will be reviewed. Special attention will be given to topics and tasks relevant for teaching in public schools. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPAN 200 - Intermediate Spanish

    Credits 4
    This course is designed to develop intermediate levels of proficiency in communicative skills. It provides a comprehensive review of the basic grammatical structures of Spanish, emphasizes vocabulary building and reading comprehension, and promotes written and oral expression in all time frames. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN 105.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SPAN 201 - Spanish for the Professions

    Credits 3
    Covers the fundamental vocabulary and grammar structures of Spanish necessary for use in a variety of professions, including business, health care and law enforcement. Students gain an important cultural awareness necessary for cross-cultural communication. After a brief survey of each occupational category, students choose one on which to focus in more depth. Prior to registration, students must take the Spanish placement test and qualify for SPAN-200 or higher to receive program director approval.
    Degree completion only. Faculty consent required. May not be audited.
  
  • SPAN 286 - Topics in Spanish

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SPAN 300 - Advanced Spanish I

    Credits 3
    This course is designed to develop competency in written and oral communication through the study of language and content. The course will give particular attention to reading Spanish-language materials relevant to student purposes. Students will increase their cultural awareness and linguistic accuracy and fluency. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-200.
  
  • SPAN 304 - Advanced Spanish II

    Credits 3
    Focuses on the translation of articles about Latin America from English to Spanish as a method of approaching grammar from the linguistic point of view. Students understand how the Spanish language works through the use of translation. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-300.
  
  • SPAN 305 - Composition and Conversation in Spanish

    Credits 3
    This course is designed for students who possess the skills normally acquired from two semesters of college-level Spanish language instruction. The student should be able to communicate well in spoken and written Spanish. The student will work on writing and understanding longer and more complex texts. The development of vocabulary, colloquial expressions and comprehension will be a part of the course, as well as impromptu communication. Attention will be given to topics and tacks relevant to public school teaching. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-300.
  
  • SPAN 309 - Hispanic Film

    Credits 3
    Students examine a variety of Hispanic films. In this process they learn the features of filmmaking and discuss the sociocultural representations of the Hispanic world. Classes are conducted in Spanish.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SPAN 310 - Hispanic Prose

    Credits 3
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the works of some of the best writers in the Spanish language, such as Borges, Cortazar, Garcia Marquez, Quiroga and Fuentes. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
    Faculty consent required.
  
  • SPAN 311 - Introduction to Literature and Theory

    Credits 3
    A survey of short works by recognized Hispanic authors from Latin America and Spain as well as the United States, reflecting the diversity of literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking countries. The readings are used to apply concepts of literary criticism and theory. Classes are conducted in Spanish. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-300.
  
  • SPAN 315 - Hispanic Poetry

    Credits 3
    This course is designed to develop appreciation for the styles and structure, as well as the themes, of the most prominent Spanish poets, such as Paz, Alberty, Lorca, Valencia, Silva and Mistral. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPAN 320 - History of Spanish Language

    Credits 3
    This course emphasizes the evolution of the Spanish language from the Roman domination of the Iberian Peninsula to the Castillian linguistic structure. Literary works will be emphasized, as well as the influence of other Romance languages on modern-day Spanish. The differences and similarities between Spanish, German and other languages will be studied. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPAN 325 - Formal Spanish Oral Communication

    Credits 3
    This is a public speaking course whose design and purpose is to prepare the student to speak correctly and confidently in public on selected topics. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPAN 327 - Spain: Civilization and Culture

    Credits 3
    Survey of the socio-political and cultural development of Spain from the pre-history of the Iberion Peninsula to contemporary times. Classes are conducted in Spanish. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-300.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SPAN 328 - Latin America: Civilization and Culture

    Credits 3
    Survey of the socio-political and cultural development of Latin America from the pre-Hispanic era to contemporary times. Classes are conducted in Spanish. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-300.
  
  • SPAN 330 - Latin American Thought: Readings in Spanish

    Credits 3
    This course is a study of the summary of the most dominant philosophies and thought in the cultural development of Latin America. Extensive oral interpretative readings will be done in class. Classes will be conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPAN 370 - Issues in Spanish Language Teaching and Learning

    Credits 3
    This course focuses on linguistic and historical knowledge useful to students considering future teaching of Spanish in both elementary and secondary school settings. It considers the special bilingual learning environment of heritage Spanish Language students in the U.S., theories of language and literacy acquisition, history of foreign language learning in the U.S., comparisons between Spanish and English language and literacy learning, and the advantages of bilingualism and needs of bilingual students. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-200.
  
  • SPAN 374 - Education Across Borders: Mexico and the United States

    Credits 3
    Many bilingual and Spanish language students in the U.S., California, and the Central Valley are from families who have had educational experiences in both the U.S. and Mexico, and who bring with them varying understandings of the role and functioning of formal education in both countries. This course explores differences in the educational systems of the two countries, the relationships between families and schools, and the resulting experiences of transmigrational students. Further it will examine language attitudes and policies affecting bilingual students in transmigrational North America, and globally, including bilingualism, language attitudes and identities, translanguaging, and language policy. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-200.
  
  • SPAN 440 - Peninsular Literature

    Credits 3
    This course includes a brief history of the Spanish language and a study of the most notable literary works and authors of Spain, along with their corresponding historical periods. The goals of the class are: 1) to enable students to develop an appreciation for Spanish culture, its people, literature and literary history; 2) to enable students to be able to identify authors and their works; and 3) to help students to recognize the styles of the various epochs and works. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-311.
 

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