Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 
    
    Apr 14, 2024  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019 - 2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Spanish Language Studies

  
  • SPAN 445 - Latin American Literature

    Credits 3
    Literary works of the most famous authors from Mexico and Central and South America will be studied, analyzed and critiqued. The historical setting of the works and the bibliographies of the authors will also be examined. Recommended prior coursework: SPAN-311.
  
  • SPAN 450 - Senior Seminar

    Credits 3
    The objective of the Senior Seminar is to develop a significant research paper that may be used toward a scholarly publication or conference paper submission. To achieve this objective, students follow the steps marked by the professor. Steps include comprehension of specific criticism and theory and the particular literary epochs, understanding of authors and cultures, and application of methodological systems of writing research papers. The final product demonstrates advanced knowledge in spoken and written Spanish and depth of analytical and critical thinking. To be taken in the student's final spring semester.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SPAN 486 - Topics in Spanish

    Credits 1 - 3
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SPAN 496 - Spanish Internship

    Credits 3
    Allows Spanish-language students to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to the real world. Students work in Spanish-speaking or bilingual settings such as a public school, tutoring program, college classroom, legal office, church, non-profit organization or business.
    May not be audited.

Special Education

  
  • SPEC 300 - Education Foundations

    Credits 3
    Students will learn the historical, legal, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of education and special education in the United States. Students will explore their own beliefs concerning children in the classroom, the gathering of knowledge, and students' learning, while understanding their role as future educators.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SPEC 310 - Introduction to Disabilities

    Credits 3
    This is an introduction course designed to provide an overview of the terminology used, identification standards, psychological characteristics, cognitive styles, and behavioral patterns that may be encountered when working with exceptional children and adults. Emphasis will be placed on collaboration between the parents, teachers and students, appropriate instructional strategies, and independent living skills. Students are required to complete 5 hours of field experience. Exploration of and completion of the assignments will lead to a deeper understanding of exceptional children and adults.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SPEC 320 - School Health

    Credits 3
    This course will assist students in understanding the essentials of coordinated school health programs that support student learning. Common physical and mental health issues will be explored. Knowledge of child abuse reporting laws and other health related mandates will be examined.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SPEC 340 - Medical Disabilities in the Classroom

    Credits 3
    This course provides an overview of medical characteristics and their implications related to medically involved special populations. It addresses the ethics and values of the professional educator as a reflective team member. It further addresses the needs of exceptional learners and their families and best practices in implementing appropriate interventions for teaching medically involved special populations. Recommended prior coursework: SPEC-610.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SPEC 350 - Introduction English Language Learner in Special Education

    Credits 3
    This course utilizes appropriate field experiences which will focus on English Language Learners in Special Education. The course will involve observations in special education classrooms serving students from birth to 22 years.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.

Social Work

  
  • SW 100 - Perspectives in Social Work

    Credits 1
    A series of site visits, videos and discussions designed to expose students to the clients, social agencies and social problems with which social workers are involved. Students visit with clients and programs related to homelessness, developmental disabilities, domestic violence, child abuse, juvenile delinquency and alcohol/drug abuse, among others. Group discussion and videos are interspersed with the site visits to help integrate learning.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 110 - Participation in Volunteer Services

    Credits 1 - 3
    A minimum of 30 hours per semester volunteering in a social agency such as Big Brothers/Sisters, OASIS, YFC, Campus Life, Neighborhood Ministry, Juvenile Hall, Fresno County's Adult Transition Program or others. Group discussions and written journals supplement the experience.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 120 - Helping People: an Introduction

    Credits 3
    By means of readings, lectures, guest speakers, videos and discussion, students develop an overview of social work as a helping profession. Beginning with a definition, theory and value base of a servant model of helping, students explore a number of fields of social work, as well as micro- and macro-social work methods. Students also examine social work as a potential career.
  
  • SW 122 - Helping People: Introduction to Social Work

    Credits 3
    A series of site visits, videos, guest speakers and discussion designed to expose students to the clients, social agencies and social problems with which social workers are involved. Students visit or hear speakers from programs related to homelessness, developmental disabilities, domestic violence, child abuse, juvenile delinquency, medial social work and alcohol and drug abuse, among others. Group discussion and videos are interspersed with site visits to integrate learning. The course introduces social work values and ethics. Brief weekly journal responses evaluate student learning.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 286 - Topics in Social Worker

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SW 300 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework:    Recommended prior coursework: PSY-120, SOC-120. This course provides a basic understanding of the nature of human behavior from a life-span development perspective using systems theory. It enables the student to explore the interrelationship of biological, psychological, social/cultural and spiritual systems to discover how they affect human growth, development and behavior throughout the life cycle. Course content is designed to help students integrate the various explanatory schemes and consider their implications for social work practice.
  
  • SW 301 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    Credits 3
    Provides a basic understanding of the nature of human behavior from a lifespan developmental perspective, using systems theory. Enables the student to explore the interrelationship of biological, psychological, social/cultural and spiritual systems to discuss how they affect human growth, development and behavior throughout the life cycle. Content is designed to help students integrate the various explanatory schemes, understand diversity and consider their implications for social work practice.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 310 - Social Gerontology

    Credits 3
    The process of aging from social, psychological, cultural and spiritual perspectives. Examines the needs and strengths of the older generation and the resources available to serve them, the fastest-growing segment of the population. Enriched by a wide variety of professional presenters, videos, field trips and lecture format.
  
  • SW 320 - Marriage and Family

    Credits 3
    An introduction to marriage and family as social institutions, with particular emphasis on the American system of mate selection, marital adjustment and changing patterns of family life.
  
  • SW 321 - Theory and Practice with Families Environment

    Credits 3
    An introduction to relationships, marriage and family as social institutions which are part of American culture and society. Using a systems-theory approach, students study families across the lifespan, from different cultural, ethnic and religious perspectives.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 350 - Urban Society and the Welfare State

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework:     Recommended prior coursework: ECON-105, HIST-150, PS-120, SOC-120. As America has become an increasingly urbanized society, growing numbers of people have become dependent upon governmental assistance to meet certain basic human needs. The result has been the gradual evolution of a welfare state welcomed by some, resisted by others. This course acquaints an understanding of the political milieu that has shaped them over time, develops an awareness of the impact they have had on their recipients and stimulates the beginnings of a value-based personal perspective regarding how an individual should respond to the issues of social justice.
  
  • SW 351 - Urban Society and the Welfare State Environment

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework:    Recommended prior coursework: ECON-105, PS-120, SOC-120. As America has become an increasingly urbanized society, growing numbers of people have become dependent upon governmental assistance to meet certain basic human needs. The result has been the gradual evolution of a welfare state welcomed by some, resisted by others. This course promotes understanding of the policies that direct the societal response to human need, social and economic justice, and oppression.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 360 - Social Problems and Public Policy

    Credits 3
    This course acquaints students with the major social problems that have emerged in recent years, and familiarizes them with the social policies that government has devised in an attempt to alleviate or remedy those problems. In so doing, it seeks to stimulate a concern about the justices and equity of such policies on individuals and groups in our society. It is designed to prepare social work students for working in the community, with individuals and groups affected by the social problems and public policies established to deal with them.
  
  • SW 361 - Social Problems and Public Policy Environment

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: ECON-105, PS-120, SOC-120. Poverty, sexism, racism, crime, drug abuse and family breakups are examples of the major problems that increasingly concern our society. At the same time, government's responsibility to deal with these problems has become widely expected. This course acquaints students with the major social problems that have emerged in recent years and familiarizes them with the social policies that have been devised in an attempt to alleviate or remedy these problems. In doing so, this course seeks to stimulate a concern about the justice and equity of such policies on individuals and groups in our society.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 390 - Chemical Dependency Intervention

    Credits 3
    This course offers an introductory overview of the addictive disease progression and its effects on family members. It gives those in the helping professions (including youth and pastoral ministry) an understanding of the basics regarding addiction, which has an impact on more than one-quarter of America's families. The societal impact of alcohol/drug dependence, the addictive thinking process, the dysfunctional family and its rules and roles are explored, as are the dynamics of addictions, such as codependency, work, food, rage, sex, gambling, perfectionism and busyness. Women's treatment issues and aspects of fetal alcohol/fetal drug syndrome are also explored, along with an understanding of 12-step recovery programs and their biblical basis. The course offers a list of community referrals for both inpatient and outpatient care, and treatment methods that target dual diagnoses clients who have both a mental illness and a chemical dependency.
  
  • SW 395 - Studies in Domestic Violence

    Credits 2
    This course is designed to give the student insights into the problems of domestic violence in American society. The students will examine the causes, symptoms and results of domestic violence on families and the community. They will become acquainted with strategies for working with victims and abusers, and how to access community and professional resources available. The course uses videos, presentations from professionals in the field, review of literature, plus lecture and course handouts.
  
  • SW 400 - Foundations of Social Work Practice

    Credits 3
    This course introduces the basic concepts of the generalist and ecological approaches to social work practice and familiarizes students with specific social work models, theories and techniques. Additionally, students learn the skills and knowledge upon which helping relationships are founded. It provides advanced practice training in case management and interviewing. Reinforces an understanding and awareness of diversity in all its aspects.
  
  • SW 401 - Foundations of Social Work Practice Environment

    Credits 3
    Introduces the basic concepts of generalist and ecological approaches to social work practice and familiarizes students with specific social work models, theories and techniques. Students learn skills and build knowledge upon which relationships are founded. Provides advanced practice training in case management and interviewing in preparation for field experience. Reinforces an understanding and awareness of diversity in all its aspects.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 410 - Working with Groups

    Credits 3
    Students experience the group process by forming small groups. The class then uses this experience, along with readings, experiential exercises and lecture/discussions, to understand the stages of a group, as well as leadership, planning, assessment and evaluation of the group process. Finally, each student practices what he or she has learned by co-leading a group for at least one class session under the supervision of the instructor.
  
  • SW 411 - Working with Groups

    Credits 3
    Students experience the group process by forming small groups. The class uses this experience, along with readings, experiential exercises and lecture/discussion, to understand the stages of groups, as well as leadership, planning, assessment and evaluation of the group process. Under the supervision of the instructor, students practice what they learn by co-leading a group for one class session.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 420 - Becoming a Change Agent

    Credits 3
    Recommended prior coursework: SW-400, SW-410. Using a task-group process and the generalist social work method, students take on the role of change agents, using themselves to systematically identify, explore and plan a change project. Interspersed with the project are a series of readings, lectures and discussions aimed at facilitating the change project, as well as understanding the range of change agent practice: community development, social planning, social action, organization development, social administration, social research and social policy.
  
  • SW 421 - Becoming a Change Agent

    Credits 3
    Using a task-group process and the generalist social work methods, students take on the role of change agents to systematically identify a need, explore options and plan a change project. Interspersed with the project are a series of readings, lecture and discussions aimed at facilitation community development, social planning, social action, organizational development, social administration, social research and social policy.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 430 - Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice

    Credits 3
    Cultural competence in social work practice requires that social workers be aware of and sensitive to the breadth of diversity found in the world. This course offers students an opportunity to obtain education about and see to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status and mental or physical disability.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 431 - Cultural Competence in Professional Practice

    Credits 3
    Cultural competence in social work practice requires that social workers be aware of and sensitive to the breadth of diversity found in the world. This course offers students an opportunity to obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SW 462 - Introduction to Social Science Research Practice

    Credits 3
    Familiarizes students with the method and process of conducting social science research, including the identification of problems, review of literature, collection and analysis of data and presentation of findings. The major focus is on integrating the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to understand and engage in research. In addition students are expected to become knowledgeable consumers of research.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 480 - Senior Seminar in Social Work

    Credits 3
    Weekly seminars focus on the integration of social work theory and practice in conjunction with the student's field instruction. Professional competency is deepened by means of videos and lecture/discussions in how to present and conduct oneself in an agency; use one's skills in counseling, group work, diagnosis and social assessment; organize and manage one's work; deal with one's feelings and stress; and refine one's career goals. Weekly journals, as well as the presentation of at least one case, are required.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SW 481 - Senior Social Work Thesis

    Credits 3
    Usually taken concurrently with SW-480 and SW-482. Students must have successfully completed SOC-461 before taking this course. Having completed their research proposal in SOC-461, students learn how to complete their research project and write their senior thesis. Students learn to conduct qualitative and quantitative research projects. They obtain IRB approval if necessary. They then conduct the chosen research, analyze their findings and write their results and discussion sections. After completing those sections, they combine all of the elements of their thesis paper from the fall and spring semesters into an integrated whole with references, appendices and acknowledgments. The final project is turned in as a culminating experience.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SW 482 - Field Instruction in Social Work

    Credits 8
    Recommended coursework:   Field instruction is the culmination of a student's social work education. Each student is placed in an agency mutually agreed upon by the student, instructor and field agency. The student works in the agency as a social worker for 32 hours per week for one semester. He or she performs such tasks as individual counseling, working with groups as a co-leader, making referrals, writing social assessments and managing a small caseload under the supervision of an MSW social worker.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 483 - Mediation Practicum

    Credits 1
    An opportunity for intensive training in mediation leading to a supervised experience in mediating actual conflicts. The practical component may be completed with the Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP) or other appropriate mediation programs, or the student may arrange to mediate an informal dispute situation approved by the instructor.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SW 486 - Topics in Social Work

    Credits 1
    Repeatable for credit.
  
  • SW 493 - Integrative Field Seminar and Thesis I

    Credits 3
    Students simultaneously engage in field experience, social science research and an integrative seminar. Field instruction is the culmination of the student's social work education. Each student is placed in an agency mutually agree upon by the student, field liaison and field agency. The student works in the agency as a social work intern for 18 hours a week under the supervision of a Master's level social worker. The seminar integrates specialized summative assignments with the students' practice in the field. Professional competency is deepened by means of videos, lecture and discussion. Students learn to organize and manage workload, conduct themselves professionally, deal with stress and refine career goals. A personal learning contract, along with an agency presentation is developed. Students engage in actual research in a real world setting. Having completed their research proposal in SW-462, students learn to complete their research project and write their senior thesis. Students learn to conduct qualitative and quantitative research projects.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 494 - Integrative Field Seminar and Thesis II

    Credits 3
    Students simultaneously engage in field experience, social science research and an integrative seminar. Students demonstrate skills in planning and evaluating case management, working within an agency, diagnosis and social assessment, and written and oral skills. At the end of this class, students are evaluated by their field instructors for competencies in the field. The seminar continues to integrate social skill development with assignments in case management, oral case presentations, dealing with crisis and other skills. Students conduct the chosen research, analyze their findings and write the results and discussion sections of the thesis.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.
  
  • SW 495 - Integrative Field Seminar and Thesis III

    Credits 3
    Students continue in their field placements, adding more advanced assignments and gaining professional experience. Seminar continues with assessment of competencies in written case presentations, preparing for termination of field experience and career development strategies. After completing required sections of the thesis, students combine all the elements of their thesis paper into an integrated whole with references, appendices and acknowledgements.
    May not be audited.
  
  • SW 496 - Integrative Field Seminar and Thesis IV

    Credits 3
    Field experience is concluded and a final evaluation from the agency is completed. Seminar culminating assignments are turned in and personal goal acheivement is assessed. The final project is turned in as a culminating experience. The senior thesis is presented in a research symposium.
    Degree completion only. May not be audited.

Theater

  
  • THTR 105 - Theater Appreciation

    Credits 3
    An introduction to the art and the craft of theater, focusing on production elements, literature and history of the stage. Attention is given to the roles that theater artists and audiences play in the theatrical experience. The purpose of the course is to increase appreciation of theater as an imaginative art form through which we tell stories about ourselves.
    May not be audited.
  
  • THTR 110 - Drama Practicum

    Credits 1
    Students may receive drama practicum credit for participating in a specific production either in an acting or production support capacity. Students register for the practicum only after they have been cast in a role or have arranged with the instructor to fulfill a production role. Credit may be received in all areas of production.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • THTR 115 - Drama Practicum: The Company

    Credits 2
    As a member of the Company, the student participates in all aspects of production, specifically as it relates to the FPU performance season. Weekly sessions provide training and opportunities in dramaturgy, light design, set and costume design and construction, stagecraft, publicity and arts administration. Students additionally take on roles as performers, as rehearsal assistants (stage managers, assistant directors, dramaturgs) and on production support crews, experiencing first-hand the artistic, interpretive and collaborative processes of moving a text from the page to the stage. Participation in the Company is based on an audition or interview with the theater program director.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • THTR 120 - Drama Ministry Team

    Credits 2
    The Drama Ministry Team is an audition-based theater troupe whose goal is to create theater-based worship experiences for on-an off-campus communities and congregations. Members must commit to a full year of participation. The team performs in College Hour, churches, Christian high schools, and other contexts.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • THTR 310 - Drama Practicum

    Credits 1
    Students may receive drama practicum credit for participating in a specific production either in an acting or production support capacity. Students register for the practicum only after they have been cast in a role or have arranged with the instructor to fulfill a production role. Credit may be received in all areas of production.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • THTR 315 - Drama Practicum: The Company

    Credits 2
    As a member of the Company, the student participates in all aspects of production, specifically as it relates to the FPU performance season. Weekly sessions provide training and opportunities in dramaturgy, light design, set and costume design and construction, stagecraft, publicity and arts administration. Students additionally take on roles as performers, as rehearsal assistants (stage managers, assistant directors, dramaturges) and on production support crews, experiencing first-hand the artistic, interpretive and collaborative processes of moving a text from the page to the stage. Participation in the Company is based on an audition or interview with the theater program director.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • THTR 320 - Drama Ministry Team

    Credits 2
    The Drama Ministry Team is an audition-based theater troupe whose goal is to create theater-based worship experiences for on-and off-campus communities and congregations. Members must commit to a full year of participation. The team performs in College Hour, churches, Christian high schools, and other contexts.
    Graded Credit/No Credit. May not be audited. Repeatable for credit.
  
  • THTR 321 - Applied Theater

    Credits 3
    An introduction to applied theater theories and practice. Through interactive activities, theater games, devising and other applied strategies, students learn skills for community engagement through drama.
    May not be audited.
  
  • THTR 330 - Dance Styles

    Credits 3
    An introduction to dance as creative expression, through a focus on dance styles related to theatrical and narrative performance. Includes styles such as ballet, jazz/musical, theater/Broadway, and dance/movement for worship. Practical experiences ground students in the basics of theatrical dance styles.
    May not be audited.
  
  • THTR 335 - Drama Ministry

    Credits 3
    An exploration of drama as ministry and as worship within the Christian tradition. The course combines an understanding of traditional styles with practical work preparing students to be practitioners of theater-based worship and ministry experiences.
    May not be audited.
  
  • THTR 340 - Musical Theater

    Credits 3
    A study of Musical Theatre performance connecting acting technique to vocal production using songs from the Musical Theatre canon.
  
  • THTR 350 - Acting

    Credits 3
    A study of basic acting theory with practical application in scene work. Particular attention is drawn to the connections between acting for the stage and the roles played in everyday life.
  
  • THTR 353 - Period Styles for Actors

    Credits 3
    Take  and  (specifically for theater majors) This course introduces students to a variety of theatrical performance styles ranging from ancient to modern. Students will learn about theatrical form and style throughout history, as well as perform material from within those styles in class.
    May not be audited.
  
  • THTR 355 - Creative Drama

    Credits 3
    This course equips people to lead others in process-oriented creative drama activities, including theater games, group improvisation, storytelling and related performance forms.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

Theology

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

Victimology

  

Wilderness Studies

  
 

Page: 1 <- Back 10 ... 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12