Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 103BL - General Chemistry IB Lab

    0
    Corequisite: CHEM 103B  
    $25 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 103L - General Chemistry I Lab

    0
    Corequisite: CHEM 103  
    $50 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 104 - General Chemistry II

    4
    A study of chemical equilibria with emphasis on acid-based chemistry and electrochemistry. The course focuses both on chemical kinetics and on principles of thermodynamics including enthalpy and free energy.
    Prerequisites: take 1 group CHEM 103  or CHEM 103A  and CHEM 103B  
    Corequisites: CHEM 104L  
  
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    CHEM 104L - General Chemistry II Lab

    0
    Corequisite: CHEM 104  
    $50 laboratory fee;
  
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    CHEM 310 - Organic Chemistry I

    3
    A study of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds with emphases on chemical nomenclature, reaction theory and kinetic mechanisms.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 104 ; Minimum grade C-;
  
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    CHEM 311 - Organic Chemistry II

    3
    A continuation of CHEM-310 including spectroscopic methods.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 310  
  
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    CHEM 312L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

    2
    A study of organic laboratory techniques. Emphasis is placed on separation/purification techniques such as distillation, crystallization and multi-phase extraction.
    Take CHEM 104 ; Minimum grade C;
    $50 laboratory fee; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 313L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

    1
    A continuation of CHEM-312L. Emphasis is placed on instrumental analysis and using kinetic and thermodynamic factors to control organic reactions.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 312L  
    $50 laboratory fee; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 321 - Inorganic Chemistry

    4
    A study of main-group and transition metal compounds with emphasis on bioinorganic chemistry, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry and solid state chemistry.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 104  
  
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    CHEM 321L - Inorganic Chemistry Lab

    0
    Take CHEM 104L ; Minimum grade CR;
    $50 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC
  
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    CHEM 340 - Environmental Chemistry

    4
    A study of the chemistry of the environment. The environmental distribution and fate of both organic and heavy metal pollutants are studied. Particular emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic and kinetic factors that determine the distribution and fate of pollutants.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 104  and CHEM 104L 
    Take CHEM 340L  
  
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    CHEM 340L - Environmental Chemistry Lab

    0
    Take CHEM 340  
    $50 laboratory fee;
  
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    CHEM 350 - Analytical Chemistry

    5
    A study of chemical equilibria as applied to the analysis and quantitation of chemical species. Statistical and sampling methodologies are also discussed.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 104  CHEM 104L ; Minimum grade CR;
    Corequisites: CHEM 350L  
  
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    CHEM 350L - Analytical Chemistry Lab

    0
    Take CHEM 104L ; Minimum grade CR;
    Corequisite: CHEM 350  
    $50 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 360 - Topics: Chemoinformatics

    3
  
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    CHEM 420L - Biochemistry

    4
    Study of the structures and properties of biological molecules, of metabolic pathways and of the kinetics and regulation of biochemical reactions.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 310L; 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
    $50 laboratory fee; Same as BIOL 420L
  
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    CHEM 450 - Instrumental Analysis

    4
    A study of the principles of chemical analysis underlying modern chemical instrumentation, including electrochemical methods, UV/visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 350  
  
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    CHEM 450L - Instrumental Analysis Lab

    0
    Prerequisites: CHEM 350  
    $50 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC
  
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    CHEM 460 - Physical Chemistry

    4
    A study of the physical principles underlying chemistry, including quantum mechanics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics and kinetics.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 104  CHEM 104L  PHYS 121  PHYS 121L  
    Corequisite: CHEM 460L  
  
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    CHEM 460L - Physical Chemistry Lab

    0
    Corequisite: CHEM 460  
    $50 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 470 - History and Philosophy of Science

    4
    A study of the major developments in the history of science, such as the scientific revolution, evolutionary theory and the historical relationships of science and religious thought. A philosophical inquiry into the nature of science forms the basis for historical study.
    Equivalent to: BIOL 470  PHIL 470  
  
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    CHEM 482 - Practicum in Chemistry

    1-2
    An experience designed for those students majoring in the natural sciences program. Students will work as tutors and/or instructional or lab aides.
    Signature required; Graded C/NC
  
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    CHEM 496 - Chemistry Research

    1-4
    All chemistry majors are required to engage in an independent research project in their senior year. This project may involve synthesis, analysis, theory or any combination of these. Students should make arrangements with the program director.
    Students may take up to 3 semesters to complete the course; Signature required; Repeatable for credit; May not be audited
  
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    CHEM 498 - Chemistry Senior Thesis

    1
    Provides an opportunity to summarize work performed in CHEM-496 or equivalent into a final senior thesis and presentation to be produced during their final semester. The student works with the faculty member under whom research was performed to produce the final materials. A final thesis includes an in-depth literature review and is intended to be a capstone project on the student’s work throughout their chemistry major.
    Signature required; Graded C/NC

College Hour

  
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    CHR 240 - College Hour

    0.5
    There is a maximum of 4 units of College Hour that may be used towards degree requirements. The purpose of College Hour is to learn, celebrate and worship as a community through music, the arts and public discourse. College Hour offers the opportunity for the university to gather to examine faith and life issues and to experience cultural, spiritual and social enrichment in the context of the Christian faith. It is required of all full-time undergraduate students.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited

Communication

  
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    COM 018 - The C.L.A.S.S.

    0
    Have you ever traveled to a different country where the culture is unlike your own? College is like that. Although it may not appear to be different, it really is a whole new world: people talk differently, dress differently. Think of The C.L.A.S.S. as your tour guide, translator and host. We want your transition into college culture to be smooth so you will have success in your college career.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 030 - The Learning Edge

    0
    The Learning Edge is an innovative approach for enhancing students’ strategic thinking processes by improving their understanding of the reading and writing processes. The course is designed to increase students’ ability to think analytically, to read rapidly with appropriate retention of ideas and to write effectively. Grading criteria will be based on pretesting and post testing indications of satisfactory work, as well as completion of the required assignments.
    Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    COM 103L - Writing Lab

    0
    The Writing Lab provides individual instruction and support for students who want to improve their writing. May include units on the writing process, organization, grammar and usage and research. Meets twice weekly. Does not meet general education requirements.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    COM 109 - Critical Thinking and Composition

    3
    Development of skills in logical persuasion, inductive and deductive reasoning, and recognizing logical errors and fallacies through the writing of short argumentative papers. Recommended prior to COM-111.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 110 - Written Communication

    3
    The course focuses on the writing process, helping students learn how to generate ideas, organize their thoughts and communicate effectively. A wide variety of writing assignments are used, including personal, expository, descriptive and persuasive writing. The course provides exposure to and experience with academic writing and research.
  
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    COM 110A - Written Communication I

    1.5
    This course examines the process of writing. Students are challenged to become flexible writers using the writing process for multiple purposes and with diverse audiences. The students are asked to apply their understanding of the writing process to their own experiences as developing writers. Expository, descriptive and narrative modes of writing are examined. Students must complete COM-110A and COM-110B to meet the general education requirement. 
    Corequisite: COM 103L  
  
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    COM 110B - Written Communication II

    1.5
    This course examines the nature of writing in academic settings. Analytical and argumentative writing is investigated. This course will address research strategies and academic writing. Students must complete COM 110A and COM 110B to meet general education requirements.
    Prerequisites: COM 110A  
  
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    COM 110H - Honors Writing Seminar

    3
    Focuses on critical reading and academic writing about a special topic chosen each year. The topic might be an author like J.R.R. Tolkien or J.K. Rowling, a genre like graphic novels or dystopian fiction, or a political issue like immigration or social justice in the education system.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 111 - Academic Writing

    3
    Development of prewriting, writing and revision skills through a review of rhetorical problems and conventions in narrative, expository and argumentative writing. Review of audience analysis, creative thinking, organizing ideas, editing and revision strategies and selected points of English usage.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 120 - Oral Communication

    3
    An introduction to communication in its oral form. The course deals with communication theories and principles. Application of communication theory occurs in a variety of activities including dyadic encounter, oral performance and public speaking.
  
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    COM 121 - Speech Communication

    3
    An introduction to communication in its public and oral form. This course explores communication theory and its application to oral performance and public speaking. Speaking and audience dynamics are examined for informative, interpersonal, and persuasive purposes.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 125 - Interpersonal Communication

    3
    Explores the nature of human communication and its influence on our lives. Language, perception, listening, verbal and nonverbal communication are elements of the course. The ways in which interpersonal communication configures in identity, interpersonal conflict, romantic relationships, friendships, mediated relationships, and families is addressed. The central role of conversation as a significant discourse is examined.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 130 - Tutor Training Practicum

    1
    This course will examine the theoretical bases of tutoring and provide discussion of and practical experience in tutoring. Break-out sessions will allow tutors to discuss theories and practices unique to their fields of study.
    Repeatable for credit; May not be audited; Graded CR/NC
  
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    COM 140 - Understanding Media

    3
    An introduction to critical media studies. Students will study various contemporary media technologies, industries, cultures, and trends including human-computer networks, social media, videogames, television, movies, and advertising. Students will develop critical media literacies to describe, analyze, and interpret the media networks that shape our communities and ourselves.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 155 - Journalism Practicum

    1-2
    Practical experience for students interested in writing for the student newspaper or other campus publications.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    COM 165 - Media Practicum

    1-2
    Practical experience for students interested in media production (including digital filmmaking, digital photography, social media, graphic design, broadcast media, web design and web management). Students will produce media projects for the campus newspaper and/or other campus offices and organizations.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    COM 210 - Advanced Academic Writing Lab

    1
    This course helps incoming transfer students make the transition to the writing expectations at Fresno Pacific University. Students will focus on the building blocks of academic writing and the revision process.
  
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    COM 300 - Creative Writing: Fiction

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-110, LIT-180. Emphasis on writing short fiction, including the short story and sketch. Open to beginning writers.
  
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    COM 310 - Creative Writing: Poetry

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-110, LIT-180. Emphasis on writing poetry. Open to beginning writers.
  
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    COM 320 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-110. Emphasis on memoir and the personal essay. Open to beginning writers.
  
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    COM 325 - Journalism Practicum

    1-2
    Practical experience for students interested in writing for the student newspaper or other campus publications.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    COM 330 - Writing and Reading Journalism

    3
    The course will include the reading of literary journalists and contemporary nonfiction writers in conjunction with journalistic writing. Course content investigates the reporting, writing, responsibilities and ethics of writing for the print media.
  
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    COM 335 - Legal Research and Writing

    3
    This course introduces students interested in a law-related career to legal research and writing. It includes an introduction to the law library, including federal and state statutory law, administrative law and case law. Computer-assisted legal research is covered, and students learn to read court decisions in order to extract the holding, summarize the court’s analysis and identify any dicta. The writing component of the course introduces students to fact-based, logic-based legal writing through the use of case briefs and other writing assignments. The focus is on a writing style that identifies the facts supporting a legal analysis and leads the reader to a logical legal conclusion.
  
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    COM 340 - Composition Practicum

    1
    This course focuses on issues related to the fields of teaching, writing and tutoring. An integral part of this course involves reading composition theory and pedagogy. This course is required for all Written Communication: Parts One and Two teaching assistants.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    COM 342 - Advanced Academic Research and Composition

    3
    Focuses on the advanced phases of conducting research and developing scholarly writing. Students learn the steps of the research process, the structure of a research/scholarly report and how to access the scholarly and professional literature surrounding a specific topic. Emphasis is placed on the critical thinking and academic writing required for successful research. Opportunities to synthesize research and the literature provided. Additionally, students explore productive techniques for developing the personal introspection, discipline and habits necessary for advanced academic work.
    Prerequisites: COM 111  
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 343 - Writing in the Natural Sciences

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM 110  or COM 110A   Familiarizes students with the writing aspects of conducting research in the sciences, such as composing a good hypothesis statement, reviewing literature on a topic, citing correctly, collecting and analyzing data, using a clear and concise writing style, and effectively presenting findings with oral presentations.
  
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    COM 345 - Composition Theory and Writing

    3
    This course will examine composition theories and their connection to the process of writing and teaching composition. Students will pursue rhetorical structures, historical approaches to composition and contemporary theory through reading, discussion, reflection, writing and research.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 346 - Scriptwriting

    3
    This course establishes the script formats for several visual media and demands regular writing practice TV commercials, PSAs, corporate training, TV drama/sitcom and interactive media. Students pitch ideas in class, write for every class and turn in weekly or more frequent written assignments.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 350 - Visual Rhetoric

    3
    This course explores the phenomenon of the visual image from a rhetorical perspective, across a variety of contexts including popular culture, religion, media and the arts: visual and verbal. By studying visual culture from a rhetorical perspective, students work to understand the phenomenology of seeing, how images are made meaningful and used to foster identification, and the impact of images on people and in shaping of culture.
  
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    COM 355 - Digital Video Production I

    3
    This course is designed to enhance audio/visual literacy and communication by promoting a deeper understanding of the primary structural elements of multimedia production. Students will learn how to perceive and manage these elements to clarify, intensify and interpret their mediated communication.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 356 - Journalism Practicum

    1-2
    Practical experience for students interested in writing for the student newspaper or other campus publications.
    Repeatable for credit; May not be audited; Graded CR/NC; Activity course
  
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    COM 360 - Digital Video Production II

    3
    A study of the key theoretical, organizational, technical and management elements in the craft of producing and directing a short video story. Through instruction and application students will gain a fundamental understanding of what is required to organize and successfully execute the production of a short digital video.
  
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    COM 365 - Media Practicum

    1-2
    Practical experience for students interested in media production (including digital filmmaking, digital photography, social media, graphic design, broadcast media, web design and web management). Students will produce media projects for the campus newspaper and/or other campus offices and organizations.
    Signature required; Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    COM 368 - Ancient and Medieval Rhetoric

    3
    A study of communication theory in the ancient and medieval world in such authors as Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine and others.
  
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    COM 370 - Audio Production

    3
    This course is designed to provide the student with a good theoretical, technical and practical foundation for audio recording. Students will have ample opportunity to develop basic skills in digital sound and recording and post production techniques.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 375 - Documentary Studies

    3
    An investigation of the history, theory, practice, and ethics of documentary through a comparative study of literary, photographic, and cinematic documentary forms.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 380 - Film Studies

    3
    Movies are a pervasive presence in American culture. This course seeks to understand the nature of film in its creative, aesthetic, social, personal and ethical dimensions. The student will be introduced to the history, technique and language of film. Through the viewing of films, the student will learn to analyze, understand and evaluate the film experience.
  
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    COM 385 - Cinematography: Visual Story Telling

    3
    This course is designed to develop students’ visualization abilities, their capacity to translate the complexities of life from script to screen in an effective and meaningful manner. Students will learn how to articulate their visualization goals in well developed storyboards and then explore methods of achieving these goals through operation and manipulation of the video camera and supporting tools.
    Prerequisites: COM 346  COM 355  
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 390 - UI/UX Web Design

    3
    This course critically examines the nature of communication on the World Wide Web. Students explore websites and forms of discourse found in new technologies for creative, theoretical and interpretative purposes.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 400 - Intercultural Communication

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-110, COM-120. A study of the principles involved in communication between people of different cultures. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspect of intercultural communication through cross-cultural contacts.
  
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    COM 410 - Media and Society

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-120. A study of mass media (television, radio, newspaper, etc.) as a social/communication force in American culture. Attention is given to media use by the church, as well as to such significant social/psychological problems as violence and sex in the media.
  
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    COM 420 - Conflict Management and Resolution

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM-120. A study of the nature of human conflict and approaches to its management, resolution and transformation. This course focuses on the generic characteristics evident in most human conflict and surveys a variety of interdisciplinary approaches for understanding and responding constructively to conflict in interpersonal, intergroup and international settings.
  
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    COM 430 - Group Dynamics and Leadership

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: PSY-120. A study of the nature of group tasks, interpersonal relations in group settings and group leadership. Provides a background of knowledge and experience helpful to the understanding of church groups, business and professional groups, educational groups and small groups in society generally.
  
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    COM 434 - Communication Skills for Professionals

    1
    Provides students the skills for enhancing their personal and workplace conversations. Formal and informal communication, along with nonverbal cues, are analyzed and practiced.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 440 - Performance and Culture

    3
    This course explores the role of performance in the making of culture. Students use performance theory and ethnographic approaches to understand individual and collective performance, ordinary and extraordinary performances, performances intended for audiences and performances in which the lines between performer and observer are blurred.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 450 - Communication Theory

    3
    This course examines current theories and models of communication in the history of the discipline. Students will read critical theory in the field of communication and consider the philosophical and theoretical perspectives in communication studies.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 455 - Philosophy of Language

    3
    A study of significant 20th century schools of thought concerning language. Disciplines encountered include philosophy, cognitive science, literary theory, sociolinguistics and etymological studies. Readings include Carroll, Lycan, Pinker, Wittgenstein,
  
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    COM 460 - Projects in Communication

    3
    A tutorial course designed for students who wish concentrated work on a major communication project. Emphasis must be on the creation of a communication message. Projects may include the creation of verbal, media, dramatic or multimedia messages. Special projects in play direction may be included in this course. Attention will be given to the theory related to the particular project, the creative development of the project and criticism of the form and message selected.
    May not be audited
  
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    COM 483 - Mediation Practicum

    1
    An opportunity for intensive training in mediation leading to a supervised experience in mediating actual conflicts. The practical component may be completed with the Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP) or other appropriate mediation programs, or the student may arrange to mediate an informal dispute situation approved by the instructor.
    Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course; Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Equivalent to: PSY 483, SOC 483, SW 483
  
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    COM 496 - Communication Internship

    1-3
    The communication internship provides a workplace and professional context in which students engage reflective practice to understand communication in its application to profession, career, and work experience. The internship is required for the major to provide insight and exposure to settings in which communication content, behavior, and theory is critical.
    Repeatable for credit; May not be audited

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 302 - Discrete Structures

    3
    The study and application of counting techniques, propositional logic, mathematical induction, set theory, recursive equations, graphs, trees, and Boolean algebra for algorithms in computing.
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 312 - Introduction to Computer Information Systems

    3
    A survey of computer information systems as used in business and industry. Topics include hardware, operating systems, networks and communication, database management and other applications, programming, security and date management, and ethical concerns and practices in the field. The programming emphasis will increase in the second half of the course.
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 320 - Computer Programming for Information Systems

    3
    Computer programming for information systems applications, highlighting data and control structures, using a current industry language.
    Prerequisites: CIS 302  CIS 312  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 330 - Operating Systems

    3
    An examination of systems architecture and control in computers dealing specifically with operating systems. Emphasis is placed on organization, use, configuration, capabilities, and security of operating systems.
    Prerequisites: CIS 312  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 340 - Data Communications and Networks

    3
    Fundamentals of data communication and networking. This course highlights network structures, performance, and security and their role in information systems solutions.
    Prerequisites: CIS 330  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 352 - Systems Analysis and Design

    3
    The study of the computing methods and technologies available to modern organizations to implement strategy and conduct operations. Emphasis is placed on the process of identifying and specifying requirements to solve organizational problems.
    Prerequisites: CIS 320  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 352 - Systems Analysis and Design

    3 Units
    The study of the computing methods and technologies available to modern organizations to implement strategy and conduct operations. Emphasis is placed on the process of identifying and specifying requirements to solve organizational problems.
    CIS 320  must be completed prior to taking this course
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 380 - Database Management Systems

    3
    An analysis of the management of data and information. Focus is put on relational databases and queries, joins, views, indexing, sequences, and security.
    Prerequisites: CIS 320  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 390 - Ethics in Computing

    2
    The social and ethical issues in computer information systems development and practice including support for quality, security, and privacy.
    Prerequisites: CIS 312  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CIS 392 - Computer Information Systems Project Proposal

    1 Unit
    The social and ethical issues in computer information systems development and practice including support for quality, security, and privacy.
    Prerequisites: CIS 320  CIS 352  CIS 380  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 440 - Systems and Network Security

    2
    Study of information security and assurance as a key component in information systems and networked solutions. Security planning as part of management process with emphasis on protection, response, and feasibility in safeguarding an organization’s information and operations.
    Prerequisites: CIS 340  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 457 - Information Systems Project Management

    3
    Study of the development and management practices utilized in information systems projects and processes, including various techniques and their assessment under different environments.
    Prerequisites: CIS 390  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 480 - Application Development with Database

    3
    Advanced topics in relational databases including opportunities for students to create database applications to address information management needs and address related issues. Increased emphasis is placed on security, productivity, performance, and recovery.
    Prerequisites: CIS 380  CIS 390  
    May not be audited
  
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    CIS 490 - Computer Information Systems Project

    1 Unit
    A cooperative experience with local industry or nonprofit to address a computer information system need via a team-based project. Students work with project coordinator to discuss planning and implementation progress. Students will present their experiences and results to the FPU community.
    Prerequisites: CIS 352  CIS 392  CIS 457  CIS 480  
    May not be audited

Collegiate Preparation

  
  •  

    CP 118 - The C.L.A.S.S.

    1
    Have you ever traveled to a different country where the culture is unlike your own? College is like that. Although it may not appear to be different, it really is a whole new world: people talk differently, dress differently. Think of The C.L.A.S.S. as your tour guide, translator and host. We want your transition into college culture to be smooth so you will have success in your college career.
    Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
  •  

    CP 150 - University Success

    3
    An introduction to Fresno Pacific University and its resources. Skills and techniques for enhancing learning outcomes in degree completion programs. Topics include adult learning, self-understanding, life planning, study skills, presentation skills, time management, overall strategies for success and critical reading, writing and thinking skills.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CP 152 - College Transitions and Success

    0
    This transition seminar aids freshman and transfer students in the following areas: 1) successful navigation of the transition to the Fresno Pacific collegiate environment, 2) increased understanding of self and others, 3) increased understanding of diversity, and 4) exploration of career and calling.
    Repeatable for credit; May not be audited
  
  •  

    CP 252 - College Transitions and Success for Transfers

    1
    The Transfer Seminar seeks to encourage and facilitate a successful transition to Fresno Pacific University. By better understanding themselves, others, and their fields of study, students will be motivated to explore how their talents and abilities might benefit others locally, regionally, and globally.
    May not be audited

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRIM 210 - Criminal Justice Administration

    3
    Explores the history and purpose of criminal justice administration agencies, with particular emphasis on a review of organization and structure of federal, state and local enforcement agencies; organization and function of the courts; interplay of probation, parole, restorative justice and victim services; and overview of penology and prison administration.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CRIM 220 - Criminal Law

    3
    Basic introduction to substantive criminal law, examining nature, origins and purposes of criminal law and general principles of criminal liability. Analysis of substantive elements of crime, including act and mental state, defenses, justifications, participatory parties and review of specific substantive crimes.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CRIM 350 - Theories of Criminology

    3
    This course surveys the various theories of the causes of crime, exploring sociological, biological and psychological explanations and schools of criminology. It also explains biblical perspectives on evil and the causes of delinquent behavior in our society.
    May not be audited
  
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    CRIM 352 - Criminology

    3
    A study of types of crime, sociological, biological, psychological, cultural, economic and political explanations for crime, and various schools of criminology. Attention is also given to a biblical/restorative justice perspective on evil and causes of deviant behavior.
    Prerequisites: PSY 120  SOC 120  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CRIM 355 - Victims, Trauma and Recovery

    3
    This course introduces the student to an overview of victimization and trauma, cycles of violence and recovery processes. Covers victimological, restorative, coping and healing concepts used to deal with the challenges victims face in a range of settings: the criminal justice system, natural disasters, war and other kinds of violence and situations involving the abuse of power.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CRIM 360 - Criminal Procedure

    3
    This course focuses on the interplay between the Bill of Rights and the criminal justice system, with particular emphasis on the application of fundamental rights of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confession, as well as, procedures and limitations prior to trial, during trial and post-conviction.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    CRIM 362 - Criminal Procedure

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120   Acquaints students with laws of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confession, procedure prior to and during trial, post conviction procedures, and limitations on criminal prosecutions and juvenile proceedings. Rules of evidence as they apply to the admissibility of behavioral, forensic and other types of evidence are examined, as well. Throughout the course specific attention is given to how the Bill of Rights endeavors to guarantee justice through the procedures of the criminal justice system and the extent to which it does so. The impact of the restorative justice movement on criminal procedures is also explored.
 

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