Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 
    
    Nov 26, 2022  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Nursing

  
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    NURS 320 - Principles of Patho-Physiology

    3
    Presents principles of patho-physiology, using a system approach, as applied to current health care practices with an examination of human body systems and disease processes. Current research related to selected major health problems is discussed and evaluated to emphasize evidence based practice across the human life span. General chemistry needed as a prerequisite.
    Prerequisites: CHEM 100  
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 330 - Health Assessment

    3
    History of psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual aspects of clients across the human life span. Head-to-toe assessment of individuals to obtain knowledge of normal findings. Common deviations and disease processes of chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma and high risk pregnancy to give patient-centered care by collaborating with other members of the health care team.
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 410 - Intermediate Pharmacology

    3
    Provides clinical pharmacological theories and concepts needed to provide safe nursing practice. Knowledge of physiological and pathological bodily response. Legal and ethical considerations related to pharmacological agents and products.
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 420 - Nursing Research

    3
    Explores the historical, ethical, legal and philosophical aspects of nursing and research. Emphasis on research process, critical analysis of clinical and legal issues and application of research to improve nursing practice.
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 430 - Teaching for Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    2
    Demonstrates the nurse's role as educator of health promotion and disease prevention with emphasis on self-care. Principles of teaching and learning theories applied to teach individuals, groups or communities. Opportunities for micro-teaching are provided. Fosters knowledge and understanding of integration of faith and learning of self-care for healthy living.
    Degree completion students only; May not be audited
  
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    NURS 435 - Public Health Nursing and Global Health Issues

    3
    Students examine epidemiological investigations of disease outbreaks and patterns of infectious and chronic diseases and injuries, environmental hazards, and other health threats in the communities and the world; to gain exposure of the large inequalities that exist in global health care. Develop knowledge, skills, and attitude to better equip public health nurses in performing their central role in supporting the health of people, locally and globally.
    Prerequisites: NURS 315  NURS 420  
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 440 - Community Health Nursing

    2
    Understanding health promotion and disease prevention at the individual and population level necessary to improve the health of the community. Develop competency in best practices, encompassing holistic aspects of community assessment for providing access to preventive and medical care, and developing policies that promote population health.
    Degree completion students only; May not be audited
  
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    NURS 442 - Community Health Nursing Practicum

    2
    Experience in community settings, helping students develop knowledge, skill and a positive attitude by collaborating with other health professionals to provide population-based assessment, interventions and evaluation to address populations at risk. Using epidemiological models, students identify levels of prevention and apply health prevention strategies to community health problems. Students develop beginning competencies in case management, infection control and a range of public health interventions.
    (Includes 90 hours of supervised clinical practicum needed to receive a Public Health Certificate from the California Board of Public Health Nursing.) Degree completion students only; May not be audited; Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course.
  
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    NURS 445 - Public Health Nursing and Community Health Assessment Practicum

    3
    Experience in community settings, helping students develope knowledge, skill and a positive attitude, by collaborating with other health professionals to provide population-based assessment, interventions and evaluation to address populations at risk. Using epidemiological models, students identify levels of prevention and apply health prevention strategies to community and global health problems. Students develope beginning competencies in case management, infection control and a range of public health interventions. (Includes 90 hours of supervised clinical practicum needed to receive a Public Health Certificate from the California Board of Public Health Nursing)
    Prerequisites: NURS 435  
    Students need 2 semesters to complete the course; May not be audited
  
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    NURS 450 - Information Technology and Health Care Economics

    3
    Addresses the impact of technology on the transformation of health care delivery to a more cost-effective as well as safer quality system. Discusses steps and issues of protection of privacy and confidentiality. Students develop basic competence in the use of information technology in gathering evidence to guide clinical decision making and in providing patient centered holistic care.
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 460 - Leadership and Clinical Management

    2
    Examines theories of leadership and management, concepts of power, motivation, decision making, budgeting and management skills of delegation, supervision, negotiation and critical decision making related to professional nursing.
    Degree completion students only; May not be audited
  
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    NURS 462 - Leadership and Clinical Management Practicum

    2
    Practical application of leadership and management theories, working with leaders/managers in an area of interest in health care.
    Degree completion students only; May not be audited; Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course.
  
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    NURS 465 - Leadership and Clinical Management With Practicum

    3
    Examines theories of leadership and management, concepts of power, motivation, budgeting and management skills of organization, delegation, supervision, negotiation, communication, collaboration, self-evaluation, critical thinking and decision-making related to professional nursing. This course also examines the nurse as a leader and manager in a variety of contexts and settings. The practicum focuses on development and application of these leadership skills in a variety of health care settings, in addition to managing client caseloads with inter-professional team members in a cost-effective manner. Special emphasis is placed on the professional role of the RN. (45 hours)
    Prerequisites: NURS 315  
    May not be audited
  
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    NURS 480 - Senior Project

    3
    This culminating experience provides students with the opportunity to integrate, apply and evaluate learning based on all work done in the program. After the experience students will do a poster presentation with abstract.
    Students need 2 semesters to complete the course; May not be audited

Peacemaking and Conflict Studies

  
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    PACS 410 - Restorative Justice

    3
    Participants examine assumptions about crime and justice. Retributive and restorative paradigms of justice are compared and contrasted. Programs and crime prevention and intervention strategies are evaluated to discern retributive and restorative positioning and outcome effectiveness.
    May not be audited
  
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    PACS 440 - Conflict Transformation

    3
    This course introduces students to biblical and contemporary perspectives that help them to understand and interpret behaviors of people in conflict. Models for constructive conflict management are proposed and training is provided in effective conflict management and mediation.
    May not be audited

Physical Education

  
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    PE 100 - Beginning Tennis

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 102 - Intermediate Tennis

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 110 - Volleyball

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 114 - Basketball

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 115 - Frisbee Games

    1
    Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 118 - Soccer

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 120 - Dance Movement

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 121 - Ballroom Dancing

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 122 - Aerobic Exercise/Kickboxing

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 123 - Self Defense

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 125 - Aerobic and Weight Training for Women

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 126 - Power Walking

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 130 - Beginning Swimming

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 132 - Intermediate Swimming

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 134 - Golf

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 136 - Strength Program

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 138 - Weight Training

    1
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    PE 146 - Backpacking

    1
    Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course; Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course; Material fees
  
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    PE 206 - Varsity Baseball

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 212 - Varsity Women's Basketball

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 214 - Varsity Men's Basketball

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 222 - Varsity Cheerleading

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 226 - Varsity Women's Cross Country

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 228 - Varsity Men's Cross Country

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 246 - Varsity Women's Soccer

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 248 - Varsity Men's Soccer

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 254 - Varsity Women's Swimming

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 256 - Varsity Men's Swimming

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 264 - Varsity Women's Track

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 266 - Varsity Men's Track

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 272 - Varsity Women's Volleyball

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 276 - Varsity Women's Water Polo

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PE 278 - Varsity Men's Water Polo

    1
    This is an activity-based course for members of the Varsity Athletic programs. Participation in this course includes fitness training, athletic team and individual practice, competition, representing FPU at select community events, and other countable at
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy

    3
    An introduction to philosophy from a variety of topical perspectives, such as human nature and human happiness, metaphysics, ontology, ethics, aesthetics, political theory and philosophical methodology. Covers texts and thinkers from the history of philosophy (East and West, ancient and modern) such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Confucius, Zhuangzi, Aquinas, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre and MacIntyre.
  
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    PHIL 101 - Philosophy: the Big Questions

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: COM 111  PHIL 104   Introduces the problems and methods of philosophy through exploring questions central to the human experience. Sample questions include: Is free will an illusion? What is the self? What is the nature of reality? How can we gain knowledge about reality? Can we prove God's existence? When is it rational to have faith? Are there moral truths? What does it mean to be a good person? What are right actions? What is life's purpose? Readings include selections from the great philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Pascal, Kierkegaard and the Buddha, as well as from more recent thinkers like Daniel Dennett, Peter Singer and Christian philosophers C.S. Lewis, C. Peter Kreeft and Alvin Plantinga.
    May not be audited
  
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    PHIL 103 - Logic and Critical Thinking

    3
    Introduction to formal and informal logic and argumentation. Emphasizes the acquisition of basic logical concepts and the development and application of skills to distinguish good from bad reasoning. The student is assisted in developing his or her ability to think critically and coherently and to construct well-formulated arguments. Skills of logical reasoning are taught through the use of everyday life cases and through influential arguments on important philosophical topics.
  
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    PHIL 104 - Applied Logic and Critical Thinking

    3
    Introduction to formal and informal logic. Critical thinking and critical analysis of various philosophical positions.
    May not be audited
  
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    PHIL 110 - Introduction to Philosophical Ethics

    3
    An introduction to philosophical ethics with various emphases such as virtue ethics, study of vices, moral theories (such as deontology, utilitarianism and divine command theory) or issues relevant to social justice. Covers texts and thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche and contemporary ethicists such as Rawls, MacIntyre, Adams or Annas.
  
  •  

    PHIL 286 - Topics in Philosophy

    1 Unit
  
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    PHIL 330 - Ancient and Medieval Rhetoric

    3
    A survey of classical western philosophy and rhetoric with emphasis on Greek and Roman thought.
  
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    PHIL 331 - Ancient Philosophy

    3
    Recommended prior course work: PHIL-100. An introduction to the main topics of ancient philosophy in the Western tradition and a survey of its development from the Presocratics through the classical schools of the Academy and Lyceum and beyond. Covers texts and thinkers such as Presocratic philosophers (e.g. Thales, Anaximander, Heraclitus, Parmenides or others), Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and issues in the schools of the Skeptics, Stoics or Epicureans. May also include ancient philosophy in Eastern traditions, examining figures such as Confucius, Mencius or Zhuangzi.
  
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    PHIL 333 - Medieval Philosophy

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: PHIL-100. This historical course examines philosophical thought from Late Antiquity through the eve of the Renaissance. Covers texts and thinkers such as Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, Avicenna, Averroes, Bonaventure, Scotus and Ockham. May also address philosophical issues emphasized in medieval thought, such as the relation between faith and reason, the existence and nature of God, problems concerning human nature or problems concerning universals.
    Signature required
  
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    PHIL 335 - Modern Philosophy

    3
    History of Western philosophy from 1600 to 1900. Covers texts and thinkers such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkley, Hume, Kant, Reid, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard or Nietzsche.
    Prerequisites: PHIL 100  
  
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    PHIL 340 - Eastern Philosophy

    3
    Acquaints students with the central ancient and/or modern philosophical traditions of Eastern civilization. Covers texts and thinkers such as Hesse, Laozi, Zhuangzi, Confucious, Dogen, Mao and contemporary Chinese philosophy.
  
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    PHIL 393 - Twentieth Century Western Thought

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: HIST-140, PHIL-100. Western philosophy and intellectual history of the 20th century. Attention is given to various topics such as logical positivism, phenomenology and existentialism, philosophy of language, post-Newtonian philosophy of science, status of the other, neo-pragmatism and global ethics. Covers texts and thinkers such as Russell, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, Levinas, Dewey, Rorty, Rawls and MacIntyre.
  
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    PHIL 405 - Philosophy of Religion

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: PHIL 100   Studies in the nature and validity of religious ideas by examining the relationship between faith and reason, arguments for God's existence, the problem of evil, miracles, belief in God in an Age of Science and the use of language to describe God. Readings include (but are not limited to) Hume, Augustine, Aquinas, Hick, Plantinga, Hasker, Griffen, Moser and Diogenes Allen.
  
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    PHIL 430 - American Wilderness Literature and Philosophy

    3
    Exploration of American ideas about wilderness, the natural world and human relationships to them. Includes a four-day field trip to the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada. Readings include Thoreau, Muir, Austin, Abbey, Snyder and Williams.
  
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    PHIL 450 - History of Political Theory and Ideas

    3
    Recommended prior course: PHIL 100   Survey of political theorizing and the development of ideas on politcal order from ancient Greece, Rome, China, as well as Jewish and Christian theology, Medieval thinkers and the development of early-modernern political philosophy. Readings include Plato, Aristotle, Han Fei Tzu, biblical authors, medieval philosophers, Locke, Hobbes, Marx and American political philosophers. and mod
    Prerequisites: HIST 120  HIST 130  HIST 140  
  
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    PHIL 455 - Philosophy of Language

    3
    A study of significant 20th century schools of thought concerning language. Disciplines encountered include philosophy, cognitive science, literary theory, sociolinguistics and etymological studies. Readings include Carroll, Lycan, Pinker, Wittgenstein, Barthes and Borges.
  
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    PHIL 460 - Philosophy of History

    3
    Designed to consider from a metadisciplinary perspective the logic and method of historical discourse. Includes examination of pattern and meaning in history and a historiographic study in a period of the student's choice. Readings include Augustine, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche and Martin.
  
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    PHIL 470 - History and Philosophy of Science

    4
    A study of major developments in the history of science, such as the scientific revolution, evolutionary theory and the historical relationships of science and religious thought. A philosophical inquiry into the nature of science forms the basis for historical study.
    Equivalent to: BIOL 470 and CHEM 470
  
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    PHIL 481 - Navajo Philosophy and Ethics

    3
    An examination of Navajo philosophy and ethics, using their cosmological and ceremonial texts, Navajo autobiographies and secondary sources that interpret their philosophy. Readings include books by Haile, Wyman, Frisbie, Farella, Witherspoon and Gill.
  
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    PHIL 485 - Senior Project

    3
    Senior Project is the capstone course in the philosophy curriculum. The project takes the form of 1) a thesis proposal, 2) a thesis-driven research paper (for historically-oriented projects), or a constructive philosophical thesis-defense paper and 3) an oral presentation of the finished work. Thesis-driven research papers typically focus on the history of philosophy and are about 20-25 pages in length. Thesis-defense papers are written on a constructive, contemporary philosophical problem and are typically about 15 pages in length. This is a project rather than simply a paper, because the project requires satisfactory completion of all three distinct parts (thesis proposal, the paper itself and the oral presentation). Guided by a supervisor in the philosophy program (or by a supervisor approved by the program director), students are expected to exemplify skills of independent research, critical and creative thinking, formal writing and oral presentation of the project.
    Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course; Signature required; May not be audited

Physical Science

  
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    PHYS 106 - Physical Science

    4
    An integrative study of the physical sciences, including the history and methods of science, the relationship of scientific truth and biblical truth and the relationship of modern technology to science and its consequences for society.
    Corequisite: PHYS 106L  
  
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    PHYS 106L - Physical Science Lab

    0
    Corequisite: PHYS 106  
    Graded C/NC
  
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    PHYS 120 - General Physics I

    4
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 140   Fundamental principles of classical physics, including statics, kinematics, rigid body motions, conservation laws, simple harmonic motion, mechanics of solids and fluids, waves, sound, heat and thermodynamics.
    Corequisite: PHYS 120L  
  
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    PHYS 120L - General Physics I Lab

    0
    Corequisite: PHYS 120  
    Graded C/NC
  
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    PHYS 121 - General Physics II

    4
    Fundamental principles of classical physics, including electrostatics, electric fields, currents, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, radiation and geometrical and physical optics. Lab not included in PHYS-121
    Prerequisite: PHYS 120  
    Corequisite: PHYS 121L  
  
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    PHYS 121L - General Physics II Lab

    0
    Corequisite: PHYS 121  
    Graded C/NC
  
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    PHYS 130 - University Physics I

    4
    Fundamental principles of classical physics including kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, simple harmonic motion and mechanical waves, and heat and thermodynamics. Calculus based.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
    Corequisite: PHYS 130L  
  
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    PHYS 130L - University Physics I Lab

    0
    Corequisite: PHYS 130  
  
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    PHYS 131 - University Physics II

    4
    Fundamental principles of classical physics including electricity, electrical circuits, magnetism, radiation, optics and light, and topics in modern physics. Calculus based.
    Prerequisites: PHYS 130  PHYS 130L ; Minimum grade CR;
    Corequisite: PHYS 131L  
  
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    PHYS 131L - University Physics II Lab

    0
    Corequisite: PHYS 131  
    Graded C/NC
  
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    PHYS 150 - Earth Science

    3
    This course presents the concepts of the major geological processes affecting the physical earth and helps students appreciate the earth and understand environmental concerns. Exercises in mineral identification are also included.
  
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    PHYS 151 - Geology and Planet Earth

    3
    This course explores the geological processes that are at work impacting this planet, and is intended to enhance an awareness of the power of nature and the environmental concerns facing Earth and its people.
  
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    PHYS 151L - Field Geology

    1 Unit
    Four Saturday or weekend field trips. Field study of geologic features and processes. Field trips may include destinations such as the Sierra Nevada, Coast Ranges, Death Valley and the central California coast.
    May not be audited
  
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    PHYS 160 - Space Science

    3
    Introduction to the fundamental principles of space science, including the solar system, its components and its origins, and stellar evolution and cosmology. Emphasis will be placed on prominent themes such as Newton's laws of motion and gravitation, conservation of energy, conservation of angular momentum, Doppler shifts, the fundamental nature of matter, fusion reactions and nucleosynthesis and general relativity.

Prior Learning Assessment

  
  •  

    PLA 201 - Prior Learning Theory

    3
    Development of a professional portfolio that includes an understanding of adult learning theory and assessment of prior learning in specific disciplines. The course provides exposure to and experience with academic writing and research. Must be taken prior to submitting prior learning assessment portfolios for potential elective credit.
    Prerequisites: COM-111;
    May not be audited
  
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    PLA 203 - Prior Learning Assessment

    1-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline for which portfolio is submitted.
    Prerequisites:PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PLA 203A - Topics in Science:

    0-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of science. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of science.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PLA 203B - Topics in Business:

    0-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of business. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of business.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
  •  

    PLA 203C - Topics in Education:

    0-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of education. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of education.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PLA 203D - Topics in Visual and Performing Arts:

    0-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of visual and performing arts. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of visual and performing arts.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    PLA 203G - Topics in Humanities:

    0-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of humanities. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of humanities.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
  •  

    PLA 203G - Topics in Religion:

    0
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of religion. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of religion.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
  •  

    PLA 203J - Topics in Social Sciences:

    0-3
    Submission of prior learning portfolio for assessment by qualified faculty in the field of social science. Students must meet English department writing standards and program learning outcomes in the discipline of social science.
    Prerequisites: PLA 201  
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited

Political Science

  
  •  

    PS 120 - American Politics and Society

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: HIST 150   Politics is central to the functioning of American society. Government's impact on residents' lives is felt in many ways and has become the dominant force shaping that society. This course acquaints students with the nature and importance of politics in American society, increases their awareness of the structure and functioning of the political system and deepens their understanding of why the system functions as it does, particularly in relationship to the nation's Constitution. The course further seeks to stimulate concern about the democratic quality of political decision making and the justice of governmental actions. (Meets the U.S. Constitution requirement for teaching credential candidates.)
  
  •  

    PS 121 - American Government

    3
    This course will survey U.S., state and local government, including the development of the U.S. Constitution and its interpretations, the various branches of the federal government, the checks and balances in place to maintain a free society, the structures and roles of state and local government, the processes by which civil authority and power are maintained, the limits of government, the development and impact of political parties and the responsibilities of the citizens of a democratic society.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    PS 300 - California History and Politics

    4
    Recommended prior coursework: HIST 150  PS 120   California is often viewed as the trendsetter for the rest of the nation. This course seeks to explain why by acquainting students with the social, cultural, economic and political development of California from early settlement to the present. At the same time, it familiarizes them with the state's current political system and the politics that surround it. (Meets the California history and government requirement for teaching credential candidates.)
  
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    PS 371 - American Law and Legal System

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120   This course is an introduction to American law and the American legal system. Students read case reports of real-world problems along with textual and appellate court discussions of alternative approaches and theories to resolving the underlying disputes. Case analysis helps students to develop an understanding of legal method and legal reasoning.
  
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    PS 372 - Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution

    1
    A review of the continuum of dispute resolution practices from negotiation to litigation. Evaluative and coercive practices will be compared to facilitating and cooperative methods. Provides an overview of the complete range of dispute resolution options.
  
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    PS 373 - Nature, Law and Policy

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120   This course is an exploration of the issues surrounding environmental law, policymaking and politics. Students study how environmental decisions are made and enforced and what their impact is locally, nationally and globally.
  
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    PS 374 - Legal Research and Writing

    3
    This course introduces students interested in a law-related career to legal research and writing. It includes an introduction to the law library, including federal and state statutory law, administrative law and case law. Computer-assisted legal research is covered, and students learn to read court decisions in order to extract the holding, summarize the court's analysis and identify any dicta. The writing component of the course introduces students to fact-based, logic-based legal writing through the use of case briefs and other writing assignments. The focus is on a writing style that identifies the facts supporting a legal analysis and leads the reader to a logical legal conclusion.
  
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    PS 380 - Social Problems and Public Policy

    4
    Recommended prior coursework: PS 120  PSY 120  SOC 120   Poverty, sexism, racism, crime, drug abuse and family breakup are examples of major social problems that increasingly concern society. At the same time, government's responsibility to deal with these social problems has become widely expected. This course acquaints students with the major social problems that have emerged in recent years and familiarizes them with the social policies that government has devised in an attempt to alleviate or remedy those problems. In so doing, it seeks to stimulate a concern about the justice and equity of such policies on individuals and groups in our society.
    Prerequisites: SOC 120  
 

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