Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Literature

  
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    LIT 355 - American Literature: Beginnings to 19th Century

    3
    A study of poetry, fiction and nonfiction during this period of literature, including such authors as Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickinson, Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman. Texts will be studied in relation to their cultural and historical contexts.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 360 - American Literature: 20th Century

    3
    Study and analysis of American writers from diverse ethnic, cultural and racial backgrounds who challenge traditional definitions of American identity. Authors may include Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath and Gloria Anzaldua.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 364 - Hispanic Literature of the United States

    3
    Study of literature written in English by Hispanic writers living in the United States. Examines the ways in which many writers wrestle with their identities as natives of the Southwest before the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, as immigrants, or as the children of immigrants. May include Central Valley authors such as Pam Munoz Ryan, Juan Felipe Herrera, and Gary Soto.
  
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    LIT 370 - The Novel

    3
    The course explores the history and development of the novel as a distinct genre in literary studies. Significant works that have had an impact on the understanding of the genre will be read and explored. Selection of novels represents multiple literature, including world literature and non-canonical texts.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 380 - World Theater: Roots to 1800

    3
    A study of early forms of theater from Africa, South and Central America, Greece and Rome, India and Japan, with attention to the role of religion in the making of early performance texts. Also explores European playtexts from the medieval to the neoclassical periods.
  
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    LIT 385 - World Theater: 1800 to Present

    3
    A study of performance texts of the 19th to the 21st centuries, drawn from various styles (e.g., realist, expressionist, absurdist, epic theater, protest theater, the musical, performance art) and perspectives (e.g., national, colonial, post-colonial, ethnic, multicultural).
  
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    LIT 395 - Text and Performance

    3
    A study of performance as a critical tool for understanding human communication. The course will examine the components of performance including text, performer, audience and context.
    May not be audited
  
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    LIT 400 - Medieval Life, Thought and Literature

    4
    A study of the intellectual and cultural life of High Middle Ages and the literature of Medieval England. Topical studies include chivalric life and romance, the literature and theology of romantic love, scholasticism and the via antiqua, theological and philosophical poetry, allegory as literature and as interpretive technique, popular literature and culture and the English mystics. Readings include selections from 12th through 14th century philosophers, theologians and mystics, as well as Arthurian Romance, Chaucer, Langland and the Gawain Poet.
    Prerequisites: HIST 130  
  
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    LIT 405 - The Renaissance and English Literature

    4
    Through readings in the humanist literature of Italy and England, this course covers the development of the early modern outlook from Petrarch through the English Renaissance ending with Milton. Thought patterns, ideas and typical genre are examined including the literature of the court; use and appreciation of the classics; epic, sonnet, pastoral and Italianate drama; the poetry of religious experience; and the distinctive character of the Christian humanist tradition in thought and poetry.
    Prerequisites: HIST 130  
  
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    LIT 415 - Shakespeare

    3
    A study of seven major plays, including comedies, tragedies and problem plays. Course includes analysis of historical background materials, literary criticism and film adaptations.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 420 - English Literature: Romantic and Victorian Literature

    3
    A study of selected poetry and fiction from these two periods. Course includes the major Romantic poets and major poets and novelists of the Victorian period.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 425 - English Literature: 20th Century Literature

    3
    A study of the poetry and short fiction of several major writers from 1900 to the 1960s, including W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, Seamus Heaney and others.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 425H - English Literature: 20th Century Literature

    3
    A study of the poetry and short fiction of several major writers from 1900 to the 1960s, including W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, Seamus Heaney and others.
    Signature required; May not be audited
  
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    LIT 426 - English Literature: C.S. Lewis

    3
    A study of C.S. Lewis’s memoir, fiction, poetry and nonfiction, as well as a biography of his life and the film Shadowlands.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 445 - Latin American Literature

    3
    Literary works of the most famous authors from Mexico and Central and South America will be studied, analyzed and critiqued. The historical setting of the works and the bibliographies of the authors will also be examined.
    This course may be taught in either Spanish or English language.
  
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    LIT 448 - Multicultural Literature

    3
    The cultural and ethnic voices of California including Hispanic, Native American, Japanese American, Chinese American, Vietnamese, Hmong and African American writers provide the focus for the reading and analysis of literature in this course.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 449 - Literature and Film

    3
    This course will focus on literary texts and their film adaptations. The course will examine the formal differences between literature and film; techniques of adaptation; and the role of historical, cultural and political issues in the adaptation process.
  
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    LIT 460 - Critical Approaches to Literature

    3
    An examination of several methods for evaluating and analyzing literature and introduction to literary criticism with application of techniques to literary genre.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 465 - Literature for Children and Young Adults

    3
    This course is a survey course in the literature for children from preschool through junior high school. The course is particularly designed to assist teachers and teacher candidates in the selection and use of literature in the classroom.
    Prerequisites: LIT 180  
  
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    LIT 467 - Literature for Children and Young Adults

    3
    This course surveys literature for children from preschool through junior high school. The course is particularly designed to assist teachers and teacher candidates in the selection and use of literature in the classroom.
    May not be audited
  
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    LIT 480 - Narrative

    3
    Narrative is a way of knowing. The stories we hear and tell shape the trajectory of our lives. This course examines narrative knowing and story from the perspectives of biblical narrative, history and culture, storytelling, the construction of a personal narrative, narrative structures and response to others’ stories. Narrative research methodologies will be employed to apprehend stories of faith and experience. The course meets capstone requirement for English, communication and drama majors.
  
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    LIT 496 - Literature Internship

    1-3
    Provides students in the English major with an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a real world setting such as a library, high school or publishing company.
    Signature required; Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 106 - College Algebra

    3
    Designed to enhance student competency with algebra. Topics include order of operations, linear relationships, graphing, solving systems of equations (linear and non-linear systems), quadratic equations, functions, exponential growth and decay, proportional reasoning to include variation, problem solving with algebra, dimensional analysis and others as appropriate.
  
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    MATH 110A - Principles of Mathematics I

    2
    MATH-110A and MATH-110B constitute a year-long slower paced version of Principles of Mathematics. Both MATH-110A and 110B must be taken to satisfy the general education requirement. MATH-110A provides exposure to a wide spectrum of mathematics. Rigorous problem-solving techniques using inductive and deductive reasoning will be studied. Topics include finite difference, Pascal’s triangle, permutations and combinations.
  
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    MATH 110B - Principles of Mathematics II

    2
    A continuation of MATH-110A. Topics include probability, statistics, number theory and topology. Includes problem solving experiences using computers. Both MATH-110A and 110B must be taken to satisfy the general education requirement.
    Prerequisites: MATH 110A  
  
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    MATH 120 - Principles of Mathematics

    4
    In this course students are exposed to a wide spectrum of mathematics. Rigorous problem-solving techniques using inductive and deductive reasoning are studied. Course topics include finite differences, Pascal’s triangle, permutations, combinations, probability, statistics, number theory and topology.
  
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    MATH 121 - Mathematical Problem Solving

    3
    This course provides a broad survey of mathematical techniques and topics, including problem solving from inductive and deductive perspectives. Topics include finite differences, Pascal’s triangle, permutations, combinations, probability, statistics, number theory and topology.
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 132 - Arithmetic and Data Analysis

    3
    This course is one of the two courses required for liberal studies majors intending to be elementary school teachers. The purpose of the course is to strengthen the students’ conceptual understanding of the mathematics taught in the K-7 settings. Topics will include: Numeration systems, a variety of algorithmic structures in arithmetic, simple set theory, probability, descriptive statistics, graphical interpretations of data, construction of appropriate graphical structures.
  
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    MATH 134 - Algebraic Thinking and Geometry

    3
    This course is one of the two courses required for liberal studies majors intending to be elementary school teachers. The purpose of the course is to strengthen the students’ conceptual understanding of mathematics taught in the K-7 settings. Topics will include: The interplay of algebra and arithmetic, generalization of algorithms from arithmetic to algebra, functions and equations, the hierarchical ordering of operations, basic analytic geometry, elementary geometric ideas of area, perimeter, classification, and spatial relationships.
  
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    MATH 136 - Mathematics Concepts I

    3
    Designed to prepare liberal arts majors for teaching at the elementary level. Topics include problem-solving strategies, number theory, algorithms for operations with numbers, prime numbers, rational numbers, proportions and probability.
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 137 - Mathematics Concepts II

    3
    Designed to prepare Liberal Arts majors for teaching at the elementary level. Focus is on various applications of the mathematical concepts introduced in part I as they are used in graphing linear equations, algebraic problem solving and geometric measurements.
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 140 - Pre-Calculus

    4
    An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytic reasoning skills used in college science and math. The course focuses on algebraic relations, functions, graphs, interpreting graphical information, elementary problem solving, abstract modeling and exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
  
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    MATH 140A - Precalculus I

    2
    This course is the first part of a two semester series: MATH 140A/B. Both courses are required to fulfill equivalent credit to MATH 140 Precalculus. An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytic reasoning skills used in college science and math, particularly in calculus. This course focuses on algebraic relations, functions, graphs, interpreting graphical information, elementary problem solving, abstract modeling, and exponential and logarithmic functions (part I) and trigonometric functions (part II).
  
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    MATH 140B - Precalculus II

    2
    This course is the second part of a two semester series: MATH 140A/B. Both courses are required to fulfill equivalent credit to MATH 140 Precalculus. An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytic reasoning skills used in college science and math, particularly in calculus. This course focuses on algebraic relations, functions, graphs, interpreting graphical information, elementary problem solving, abstract modeling and exponential and logarithmic functions (part I) and trigonometric functions (part II).
    Prerequisites: MATH 140A  
  
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    MATH 210 - Calculus I

    4
    Analytic geometry, relations and functions, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of differentiation.
    Prerequisites: MATH 140  
  
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    MATH 220 - Calculus II

    4
    Integration, applications of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, techniques of integration.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
  
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    MATH 230 - Calculus III

    4
    Fourier series and applications, vectors in the plane, vectors in space, dot and cross products. Calculus of polar and parametric curves, ideal projectile motion, the TNB reference frame, arc length parameter. Partial derivatives, partial derivatives with constrained variables, directional derivatives, Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals and applications, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, substitutions in multiple integrals.
    Prerequisites: MATH 220  
  
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    MATH 250 - Introduction to Statistics

    3
    Introduces basic concepts of analysis and interpretation of data collected in a statistical frame work. Primary course objectives are to develop mastery of basic statistical concepts, to develop the ability to apply these concepts correctly, to communicate effectively in writing the results of a statistical analysis and to gain exposure to modern statistical computing software. Topics include but are not limited to summarizing and graphing data, central tendency, measures of variations, measures of position, binomial distribution, normal distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA).
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 311 - Statistics for the Natural Sciences

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-140. Introduces basic and advanced concepts of analysis and interpretation of data collected in a statistical framework. Primary course objectives include mastery of basic and advanced statistical concepts, ability to apply these concepts correctly to natural science fields, communicating results of statistical analysis effectively in writing and exposure to modern statistical computing software such as SPSS. Topics include summarizing and graphing data; measures of central tendency; probability; discrete, binomial, normal, t, and chi-square distributions; central limit theorem; hypothesis testing; estimation; and one- and two-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, and nonparametric statistics. Applications of each topic to biology, chemistry and health-related fields.
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 320 - Principles of Geometry

    3
    Fundamental concepts of Euclidean geometry from the modern point of view; axioms of collinearity, order, congruence, theorems of Ceva and Menelaus, loci, transformations of the plane; selected topics from geometry of the circle and triangle; non-Euclidean geometries.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
  
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    MATH 325 - Introduction to Topology

    3
    Covers fundamentals of topology, including topology of line and plane, topological spaces, continuous function and homeomorphisms, basis for topology, metric spaces, connectedness and compactness.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 330 - Abstract Algebra

    3
    Groups, rings, integral domains, ordered fields, isomorphisms; rational, real and complex numbers.
    Prerequisites: MATH 350  
  
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    MATH 331 - Abstract Algebra II

    3
    A continuation of MATH-330, this course covers rings, fields, Sylow theorems, symmetry and counting and introduction to Galois theory.
    Prerequisites: MATH 330  
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 335 - Linear Algebra

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-220. Techniques for solving systems of equations, examination of existence and uniqueness of solutions, matrix operations, matrix inverses, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, vector spaces, linear transformations, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization and applications of linear algebra to calculus, least squares solutions and differential equations.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
  
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    MATH 340 - Number Theory

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-350. Divisibility, prime numbers, greatest common divisor, Euler’s function, arithmetic functions, congruences, Diophantine equations and continued fractions.
  
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    MATH 345 - Numerical Analysis

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH-220, MATH-335, CSSE-121. Elementary discussion of sources and propagations of errors, numerical solutions to linear systems of equations and nonlinear equations, numerical techniques for solving the algebraic eigenvalue problem, numerical differentiation and integration.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
  
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    MATH 350 - Problem Solving

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 210   An investigation of the process of problem solving in mathematics. Topics studied include specialization, generalization, analogy, induction, recursion, etc. Practice in applying these ideas to a variety of non-routine problems, and presenting solutions and proofs in written and oral formats.
  
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    MATH 357 - Operations Research

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 210   Introduction to mathematical optimization with applications to business and finance. Graphical and numerical solutions, using the simplex method and linear programming. Duality, transportation and assignment problems, network optimization, dynamic programming, integer programming, nonlinear programming, simulated annealing, introduction to game theory and decision analysis. A brief introduction to queuing and inventory theory.
    Prerequisites: MATH 140  
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 360 - Probability and Statistical Methods

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 230   Brief overview of descriptive statistics, basic probability theory, counting methods, Bayes’ theorem and applications. Discrete and continuous random variables and their respective distributions, expected values, variance, the central limit theorem. Joint probability distributions, covariance and correlation. Inferential statistics, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, introduction to analysis of variance. Linear regression and correlation, nonlinear and multiple regression.
    Prerequisites:MATH 220  
  
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    MATH 362 - Mathematical Statistics

    3
    Basic probability theory, discrete distribution, moment generating functions, continuous distribution functions, bivariate distribution functions of random variables, the Central Limit Theorem Parameter estimation, random number generation, confidence intervals, sample size, regression analysis, non-parametric method, hypothesis testing.
    Prerequisites: MATH 230  MATH 360  
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 365 - Differential Equations

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 220   This course emphasizes approaches to solving first-order and second-order linear differential equations, numerical solutions. Both qualitative and quantitative solutions are emphasized. In addition, students are intro ducted to the existence-uniqueness theorem and to applications in the physical and life sciences.
    Prerequisites: MATH 220  
  
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    MATH 370 - Discrete Mathematics

    3
    Counting techniques, mathematical induction, set theory, algebra of matrices, difference equations, graphs, trees, Boolean algebra and algorithms.
    Prerequisites: MATH 140  
  
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    MATH 375 - Introduction to Game Theory

    3
    Recommended prior course: MATH 210   Game theory is a collection of mathematical models used to study situations involving conflict and/or cooperation. This contemporary mathematical subject is concerned with human interactions, competitive encounters, notions of value, bargaining and negotiations and fairness. It has application throughout social, systems, behavior, managerial and decision sciences. The course covers two person zero sum non-cooperative games, two person general sum non-cooperative games, two person general sum cooperative games, games in extensive form and games in n-person collisional form.
    Prerequisites: MATH 210  
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 415 - Advanced Applied Mathematics

    3
    Recommended prior course: MATH 365   This two-part class covers the basics of vector calculus in part I, and an introduction to calculus of variations in part II. Part I will include line integrals, the fundamental theorem of line integrals, forms of Green’s Theorem, surface area and surface integrals, and the theorems of Gauss and Stokes. Part II will cover the concepts of functionals, various representations of the Euler-Lagrange Equation, numerical techniques including weighted residuals, optimizing functional expressions with constraints, and applications to dynamics, structure of materials, geodesics and quantum mechanics.
    Prerequisites: MATH 230  
  
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    MATH 418 - Fourier Analysis

    3
    An introduction to principles and applications of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Includes Fourier sine and cosine series, complex form of Fourier series, Parseval’s theorem, Fourier integral, Fourier transform and its properties, convolutions, application to partial differential equations, windowed Fourier transforms, Shannon’s sampling theorem, discrete Fourier transform, sampled Fourier series, the n-point DFT and filtering, fast Fourier transform, amplitude and frequency modulation, application to music composition and a brief introduction to wavelets.
    Prerequisites: MATH 230  
    May not be audited
  
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    MATH 420 - Real Analysis

    3
    Recommended prior course: MATH 350   Students study logic, set relations, functions, sequences, continuity, differentiation and an introduction to the Riemann Integral. An emphasis is placed on developing the ability to handle definitions, theorems and proofs. A course goal is the deepening of the student’s understanding of the logical foundations of single-variable differential and integral calculus.
    Prerequisites: MATH 220  
  
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    MATH 421 - Real Analysis II

    3
    A continuation of MATH-420, this course covers infinite series, sequences and series of functions, power series, the Riemann-Stieltjes Integral, metrics and further topology of real numbers. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to handle definitions, theorems and proofs. A course goal is the deepening of the student’s understanding of the logical foundations of the calculus learned in MATH-210 and MATH-220.
    Prerequisites: MATH 420  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MATH 454 - Complex Analysis

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: CSSE 121   This course will include the algebra and geometry of complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy Riemann Equations and harmonic functions, elementary functions including rational, exponential, trigonomic and logarithmic functions, the Contour Integral, independence of path, and Cauchy’s integral theorem. A focus is placed on the application of complex valued functions.
    Prerequisites: MATH 230  
  
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    MATH 477 - Independent Research in Mathematics

    1-3
    Working with faculty, the student selects a mathematical topic of interest appropriate to their program, prepares a concise and clear abstract, a review of relevant published literature, and a brief research proposal. The student then develops independent work on this topic, some of which may consist of duplicating published results, and completes a written report on the results.
    Students may take up to 2 semesters to complete the course; Signature required; Repeatable for credit; May not be audited
  
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    MATH 480 - History of Mathematics

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MATH 220   A historical survey of mathematical development from earliest times to the 20th century, including topics such as number systems, geometry, algebra, calculus, and subsequent modern developments. This course address the societal and cultural contexts of these developments in addition to the historical techniques themselves.
    Prerequisites: MATH 320  MATH 340  MATH 350  
  
  •  

    MATH 482 - Practicum in Mathematics

    1-2
    An experience designed for those students working towards a single subject teaching credential in mathematics. Students will work as tutors and/or instructional aides. Also open to selected non-math majors who would like the experience of serving as math tutors.
    Signature required; Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
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    MATH 485 - Senior Seminar in Mathematics

    1
    A capstone course for Mathematics majors to be taken in the final Spring semester before graduation. Includes seminar presentations by students and faculty on advanced topics of interest and experience. Students must develop and refine a presentation on a research project, review paper or internship experience. Other summative activities such as a portfolio, major field test or reflective essay may be required.
    May not be audited

Management

  
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    MGT 315 - Principles of Management

    3
    Introduces management as a science and develops some of the major themes.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MGT 350 - Organizational Theory

    3
    A study of organizational structure and design. Topics include the external environment, the role of technology, types of organizational and task structures and management practices.
  
  •  

    MGT 352 - Organizational Communication

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MGT-350. A study of organizational communication from three perspectives: 1) written forms of organizational communication; 2) personal forms of communication, such as oral, interpersonal and employment; and 3) technological communication. Students are exposed to both the theoretical and applied issues as they relate to these forms of communication.
  
  •  

    MGT 353 - Organizational Communication

    3
    A study of organizational communication from the perspectives of oral forms of business communication, technology-enabled communication, fundamentals of business writing, values and ethics, communication behaviors and communicating for effectiveness when dealing with organizational conflict.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MGT 355 - Organizational Behavior

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MGT-350. A study of group dynamics, conflict resolution and organizational control; theories of work, motivation and leadership; human differences, cross-cultural analyses of managerial processes and management of human resources.
  
  •  

    MGT 360 - Human Resource Management

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MGT-350. A study of recruitment, selection and employment procedures; performance appraisals; and labor relations.
  
  •  

    MGT 362 - Nonprofit Management

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: MGT-350. This course provides an understanding of nonprofit management. During the course, the following topics are highlighted: board of trustees, volunteerism, grant writing and general nonprofit management.
  
  •  

    MGT 368 - Operations Research

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: BUS-465. A study of the quantitative decision-making process, as well as the research methods that enable the prospective manager to handle operations systems and problems, including facility location, materials handling, operation planning and control, inventory control and work measurement. Students learn how to apply quantitative methods to the solution of national and international operations problems.
  
  •  

    MGT 441 - Community Project Proposal

    2
    Completion of a proposal for the community project.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MGT 442 - Community Project

    3
    This is the major project directed to business organizations and the community.
    Prerequisites: MGT 441  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MGT 443 - Organizational Project

    3
    Students create an in-depth written project designed to systematically improve an organization.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MGT 450 - Management and Organizational Behavior

    3
    This course examines the role of management, servant-leadership and people within organizations. The course also looks at structure and culture related to productivity and change.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MGT 457 - Risk Management

    3
    Students learn to identify and analyze all types of organizational risk and manage this risk through insurance and other tools. The overall assumption will be that risk can be managed if it is identified prior to a loss.
  
  •  

    MGT 460 - Human Resources Management

    3
    Starting with the philosophy and theory of human resources management, students will study the policies and practices affecting employment issues, anti-harassment, equal employment opportunity, diversity, performance appraisal, fair labor standards and internal labor relations.
    May not be audited

Ministry

  
  •  

    MIN 200 - Perspectives on Contemporary Christian

    1
    An introductory look at the various ministries and opportunities for those interested in the field of contemporary Christian ministries. Class time will be spent in discussion and on-site observation of ministries and Christian agencies, exposing students to a breadth of perspectives.
  
  •  

    MIN 288 - Missions Practicum

    1-4
    Signature required; Repeatable for credit
  
  •  

    MIN 310 - Perspectives in CML

    1
    An introductory look at the various ministries and opportunities for students pursing a Christian ministry and leadership major. Students are oriented to their program-long internship in this course, culminating in the selection of a ministry internship and field supervisor.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 330 - Disability Ministry Concepts

    3
    Overview of important theological concepts related to disability and suffering. In this course, students are exposed to biblical texts, theological readings, and practical applications of those texts and readings, so that each student may begin formulating his or her own perspectives on God’s intentions related to disability and suffering.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 340 - Theology, Culture and U2

    2
    The rock band U2 has delivered a consistent message of Christian faith and social justice since its 1980 debut album. The band members, heavily influenced in their early years by living in war-torn Ireland and belonging to a Christian community called Shalom, fill their music with rich biblical imagery. Lead singer Bono has become a political activist, addressing global issues of poverty, inequity, fair trade, AIDS and debt relief. In this course students explore how U2’s message and theology interact with culture to create a unique expression of Christian faith. The course critically examines the works of U2 and challenges students to think theologically about current cultural issues.
  
  •  

    MIN 356 - Church and the Mission of God

    2
    Investigates the nature of the church (ecclesiology) in light of historical theological and sociological perspectives. Emphasis is given to the church’s role in the Missio Dei as it relates to local and global contexts.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 357 - Christian Leadership and Administration

    4
    A study of the biblical concept of leadership for those within the church, Christian community and/or secular world. The life of Jesus Christ will be the primary model for this examination, focusing on the principles and values found in the Kingdom of God. Each student will integrate the course content with a small practicum experience.
  
  •  

    MIN 358 - Creative Communication in Ministry

    2
    An examination of how to creatively communicate the Bible to different age groups in a variety of settings. Basic learning theory, teaching methods of Christ and a variety of contemporary methodologies will be covered.
  
  •  

    MIN 360 - The Church in an Urban World

    3
    This course attempts an analysis of the nature and function of the church from a theological and sociological perspective. How can the church faithfully minister to broken and hurting people in an urban culture? When is change warranted and what contemporary methods of ministry are appropriate and effective for the church facing an urban future? How can the church penetrate its urban community with the good news of the Gospel? These and other questions will be studied.
  
  •  

    MIN 375 - Discipleship and Evangelism

    2
    This course will study the biblical basis for evangelism and discipleship. Through a series of reflective and practical assignments, students will examine the responsibility of church and individual for this topic in a postmodern, unchurched culture.
  
  •  

    MIN 376 - Current Practices in Evangelism and Discipleship

    2
    Study of the biblical basis for evangelism and discipleship. Students examine the responsibility of the church and the individual for these areas in a postmodern, unchurched culture.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 378 - Introduction to Worship Ministries

    3
    For those choosing to pursue a ministry in church worship. The course will examine the nature and principles of Christian worship; liturgical, traditional and contemporary forms of worship will be examined. The emphasis will be on leading and coordinating corporate worship in the local church.
  
  •  

    MIN 379 - Spiritual Formation

    2
    The emphasis in this course is on developing and maintaining the personal spiritual disciplines vital for effective ministry. Prayer, meditation, interaction with Scripture and the journey inward are explored. Spiritual formation and character development are the goals of this course.
  
  •  

    MIN 382 - Introduction to Children’s Ministries

    3
    For those choosing to pursue a ministry to children, this course will focus on the design, planning and implementation of programs of ministry for children. A study of the developmental needs of children and an overview of current children’s ministry options are offered.
  
  •  

    MIN 383 - Introduction to Youth Ministries

    3
    This course will examine some basic theological, cultural and philosophical understandings of ministry to adolescents. Students will develop their own personal philosophies of youth ministry through reflection and investigation of course content.
  
  •  

    MIN 386 - Youth Ministries Methods

    3
    This course will examine some basic building blocks and programs/methods of a healthy ministry to adolescents. Students will add to their work in Introduction to Youth Ministries by developing a holistic and practical program of youth ministry.
    Prerequisites: MIN 383  
  
  •  

    MIN 390 - Introduction to Preaching

    2
    A practical exploration of preaching as a specific method of communication, looking at the various of sermon preparation and different types of sermons. Students will observe and critique preaching, as well as prepare and present sermons within the class.
  
  •  

    MIN 392 - Biblical Interpretation and Teaching

    2
    An examination of how to accurately interpret the Bible and communicate it appropriately, according to context. Basic learning theory, teaching methods of Christ, investigation of sermon preparation and styles and a variety of methodologies are considered.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 396 - Ministry Discernment

    1
    All students majoring in contemporary Christian ministries will be required to take this discernment course in the spring semester of their sophomore or junior year. The course will use a number of practical assessment tools and small-group encounters to help clarify giftedness, ability and call to ministry.
  
  •  

    MIN 397 - Spiritual Formation: Perils, Pitfalls and Potential of Ministry

    2
    Promotes discernment for ministry and spiritual formation of the pastoral leader by encouraging students to consider the various dangers and opportunities of ministry. Emphasizes developing and maintaining the spiritual disciplines vital for effective ministry. Prayer, meditation, interaction with Scripture and the journey inward are explored. Also explores questions related to calling and ministry giftedness through the use of practical assessment tools, group discussion and conversation with field supervisors.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 398 - Spiritual Formation: Cultivating a Prayerful Heart

    2
    Promotes discernment for ministry and spiritual formation of the pastoral leader by engaging students in the development of a life of prayerfulness and sensitivity to God’s direction. Emphasizes developing and maintaining the spiritual disciplines vital for effective ministry. Prayer, meditation, interaction with Scripture and the journey inward are explored. Also explores questions related to calling and ministry giftedness through the use of practical assessment tools, group discussion and conversation with field supervisors.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 399 - Spiritual Formation: Taking Care of the Inner Life

    2
    Promotes discernment for ministry and spiritual formation of the pastoral leader by developing important areas of spiritual self-care as part of a long-term view toward lifelong ministry. It emphasizes developing and maintaining the spiritual disciplines vital for effective ministry. Prayer, meditation, interaction with Scripture and the journey inward are explored. Also explores questions related to calling and ministry giftedness through the use of practical assessment tools, group discussion and conversation with field supervisors.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 420 - Ministry Across Cultures

    2
    This course aims to equip students to understand the role of culture in human life and faith and to understand cultures different from their own. Students will investigate major world religious traditions, learn how Christians live and believe in other parts of the world and develop an understanding of how to minister in cross-cultural settings.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    MIN 430 - Urban Ministry

    2
    Students are introduced to the issues and problems of ministering in urban settings. Special attention is paid to critically examining the biblical text for developing models and strategies for caregiving and ministry.
    May not be audited
 

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