Jan 24, 2022  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2017 - 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This listing includes traditional undergraduate courses, degree completion courses and designated subjects education courses. Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campus locations.

 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 220 - Principles of Accounting I

    4
    Accounting is an information and measurement system that identifies, records and communicates relevant information to decision makers. Accounting is the language of business. The ability to understand and use this language is essential in today’s competitive marketplace regardless of role. This course provides students with the underlying concepts, theories and procedures for recording, classifying, adjusting, summarizing and interpreting financial data for service and merchandising entities. Additional tutoring sessions are required.
  
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    ACCT 230 - Principles of Accounting II

    4
    A continuation of the principles of accounting with an expansion into the issues of managerial accounting. Topics include: budgeting, cost accounting, financial analysis and the statement of cash flows. Additional tutoring sessions are required.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 220  
  
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    ACCT 301 - Accounting for Management

    3
    Managers in business need information in order to make appropriate decisions. This course deals with identifying, measuring, analyzing, interpreting and communicating information in order to achieve organizational goals. Ratio analysis will be used to ascertain appropriate financial stability.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    ACCT 400 - Intermediate Accounting I

    4
    Financial accounting provides relevant information to users external to the business, i.e., investors and creditors. The methods of providing this information are through financial statements and related notes attached to the formal financial accounting, and are designed to prepare a student for a career in accounting.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 230  
  
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    ACCT 405 - Intermediate Accounting II

    4
    A study of the principles, procedures and reporting requirements in financial accounting. A continuation of ACCT-400.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 400  
  
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    ACCT 410 - Cost Accounting

    4
    A study of the major approaches to internal accounting issues, including flexible budgeting, cost allocation and product costing, with an emphasis on decision making, planning and control. Use of computers is included.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 230  
  
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    ACCT 415 - Tax Accounting

    4
    A study of the rules and principles of taxation of individuals and business entities (corporations and flow-through entities).
    Prerequisites: ACCT 230  
  
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    ACCT 417 - Accounting Information System

    3
    Organization and implementation of information technology for the collection, organization, and presentation of accounting information with an emphasis on accounting software and spreadsheet application in a business environment. This course reinforces students accounting knowledge and builds technology proficiency by usong spreadsheet and accounting software to perform practical accounting tasks, reporting and financial analysis
    Prerequisites: ACCT 220  
    May not be audited
  
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    ACCT 418 - Nonprofit Accounting

    3
    A study of the concepts, principles and problems of accounting for governmental and nonprofit organizations. Fund accounting, budgeting, cash planning and control are presented in the context of governmental and nonprofit decision making.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 230  
  
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    ACCT 420 - Auditing

    4
    Students learn the methods and procedures used to verify the accuracy and responsible reporting of financial information within the ethical framework of the professional auditor. Generally accepted techniques for evaluation of internal control procedures and the auditing of computer accounting systems are included.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 400  
  
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    ACCT 421 - Accounting Ethics and Professional Responsibilities

    3
    This course provides the ethical grounding that accountants need both to identify ethical issues that they might face and to respond effectively to them. Students will be introduced both to the major theoretical ethical reasoning models and the ethical principles included in the Codes of Professional Conduct disseminated by the major accounting organizations, such as the AICPA, IM, IIA, and FEI. The course will present a range of ethics-related issues, including the causes of ethical violations and frauds, whistle blowing, and the design and operation of company compliance and ethics programs. Ethical issues are illustrated in all major areas of accounting practice, including financial accounting and reporting, management accounting, audit, taxation, accounting information systems, forensic accounting and accounting-related consulting.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 400  
    May not be audited
  
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    ACCT 425 - Advanced Accounting

    3
    A study of the concepts of corporate mergers and combinations, partnerships and international accounting issues.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 400  
  
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    ACCT 451 - Financial Statement Analysis

    3
    Focuses on the student as a financial analyst/accountant/money manager. Students learn to 1) make the numbers tell what they need to know in decision making and give them information they can act on, 2) examine how financial statements can be manipulated to control the perceptions of investors and creditors, and 3) gain knowledge to avoid such manipulation and to offer a balanced treatment of the main types of financial statements as mirrored in the real world.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 230  
  
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    ACCT 481 - VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)

    1
    Students participate in the Volunteer Income Tax help to people with low income, persons with disabilities, the elderly and limited English speaking taxpayers who need assistance in preparing their own tax returns. IRS-certified volunteers (students) provide free basic income tax return preparation with electronic filing to qualified individuals.
    Repeatable for credit; May not be audited
  
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    ACCT 482 - Accounting Internship

    2
    The accounting internship course is designed to provide an external real world experience for accounting students. Students will have an exposure to the accounting practice and an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills that they have acquired in classrooms.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 400  
    May not be audited

Art

  
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    ART 110 - Art Appreciation

    3
    Discussion of the history, vocabulary, methods and media of art through presentation of examples from various art movements and cultures.
  
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    ART 111 - Art Appreciation

    3
    Through the examination of examples from various art movements and cultures, this course explores art through a discussion of the history, vocabulary, methods and media of art.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 115 - Introduction to the Art Industry

    3
    Introduces students to the multifaceted art industry and allows students to explore different art fields, such as arts councils, art museums, art education, design, photography and architecture. Encourages students to better understand and to discover which area of art they will pursue and in what capacity.
  
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    ART 120 - Painting I

    3
    An introduction to painting processes through studio problems and critiques. This class is designed to foster an understanding of color harmony and compositional balance in a painting.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 140 - Drawing I

    3
    Serves as an introduction to the basic principles of observational drawing. Students will learn about drawing media, techniques and composition through group critiques, lectures and individual research.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 150 - Principles of Design

    3
    Design elements and their fundamental application in two-dimensional visual art. Explores the principles of visually organizing those elements, while exploring creative thought processes and methods of visual analysis. Explorations of a variety of materials, techniques and vocabulary specific to the fine art of design.
  
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    ART 161 - Art Around the World

    3
    Examines visual art and architecture from diverse non-Western cultures, such as Africa, Asia, the Americas and Oceania, dating from prehistory to the present day. Art works will be studied in their historical, social, religious and stylistic contexts. Examines cultural and artistic highlights which have illuminated the past and which continue to influence contemporary culture.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 170 - Sculpture I

    3
    Basic practice in the expressive use of form and color in space. Use of a variety of media, such as clay, plaster, wood and mild steel. Course uses both historical and contemporary approaches to develop content.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 180 - Ceramics I

    3
    The fundamentals of forming both hand-built and wheel-thrown objects. Basic techniques of surface embellishment and glazing will be featured. An awareness of three-dimensional form will be stressed.
    May not be audited; $25 material fee
  
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    ART 230 - Basic Graphic Design

    3
    Introduction and review of the basic elements of design and semiotics as they are used in two-dimensional layouts. Introduction of Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Students learn how to set up documents and create illustrations and layouts in these three programs. Introduction to typography.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 300 - Art for Elementary Teachers

    3
    This course is designed to introduce studio art, art history, art criticism and aesthetics to the future elementary school teacher. This class will provide a foundation for lifelong learning within the art discipline. Competencies pertaining to art instruction will be developed through various art experiences based upon art education theory and practice.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 301 - Art Fundamentals

    3
    This course is designed to introduce studio art, art history, art criticism and aesthetics to the future elementary school teacher. This class will provide a foundation for lifelong learning within the art discipline. Competencies pertaining to art instruction will be developed through various experiences based upon art education theory and practice. A lab fee will be charged to cover various materials for hands-on demonstrations.
    May not be audited; $20 Material fee
  
  •  

    ART 305 - Life Drawing

    3
    An advanced drawing course dedicated to the rendering of the human figure. Students explore a variety of techniques and materials, expanding their visual understanding and sensitivity to the proportions of the human body.
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 315 - Digital Photography

    3
    Instruction in basic digital photographic practices and methods. Emphasis on creative use of the camera for communication and expression. Introduction to Photoshop CS3 for photo correction and manipulation.
  
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    ART 320 - Painting II

    3
    An extension of what has been learned in Painting I. The student will be encouraged to rely on intuition for creative ideas and directions.
    Prerequisites: ART 120  
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 325 - Modern and Contemporary Art

    3
    Considers various modernist artistic developments of the 20th century through to artistic developments of the present day, including issues facing artists.
  
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    ART 330 - Art and Religion

    3
    Examines how spirituality has been present and evident through artistic expression since the beginning of time. Through the examination of various examples of art and architecture, students will learn about the creativity of different cultures and religions, and how they compare to the Christian faith.
  
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    ART 340 - Drawing II

    3
    Further explores principles introduced in Drawing I. A competent handling of the drawing medium, strong understanding of the elements and principles of design and a conceptual approach to subject matter will be fostered through critiques, discussions and individual research.
    Prerequisites: ART 140  
    May not be audited
  
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    ART 350 - History of Western Art I

    3
    Explores Western art in its historical and cultural contexts, from prehistory to the Renaissance, in an attempt to better understand the creativity of those who lived before and how art has influenced modern culture.
  
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    ART 355 - History of Western Art II

    3
    Explores Western art in its historical and cultural contexts, from the Renaissance to the present day, in an attempt to better understand the creativity of those who lived before and how art has influenced modern culture.
  
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    ART 360 - Typography

    3
    A study of design, use of basic letter forms, typographic development hierarchy of information, major type families, characteristics and typographic grids. Students build skills for the art of typesetting, typographic layout, expressive typography and conceptual thinking.
  
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    ART 365 - Exploring Color

    3
    An exploration of color through elements of design. Students learn about developing color relationship to composition skills through harmony and contrast. This course involves the development of color perception, expression and application in traditional and digital imagery, using two-dimensional formats through a series of problem-solving exercises and projects, using Photoshop and Illustrator.
  
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    ART 380 - Ceramics II

    3
    Higher levels of creative expression through clay. Large, nonfunctional pieces such as wall hangings and sculptures will be encouraged. A more competent handling of the potter’s wheel will be required.
    Prerequisites: ART 180  
    May not be audited; $25 material fee
  
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    ART 430 - Advanced Graphic Design

    3
    Students work with longer documents, multiple layers and styles, and three-dimensional illustrations. Students learn color management for output for print or Web.
    Prerequisites: ACCT 230  
  
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    ART 435 - Museum Studies

    3
    Examines various aspects of the museum industry and its history. Equips students with the skills necessary to seek careers and job opportunities in the arts and museum industry.
  
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    ART 440 - Exhibition and Gallery Design

    3
    Examines art theory and technique and applies it to the gallery space. Students learn practical aspects of exhibition and gallery design. This course is essential for those who wish to pursue careers as practicing artists, curators, gallery or museum workers.
  
  •  

    ART 450 - Project in Art

    3
    For advanced students with art major; course is seen as the final project before completion of major. Involves a public presentation of work from production to exhibit.
    Signature required; Repeatable for credit; May not be audited
  
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    ART 460 - World Art

    3
    Examines visual art and architecture from diverse cultures from prehistory to the present day in their historical, social, religious and stylistic contexts. Study of the diverse cultural and artistic highlights that have illuminated the past and that continue to fuel contemporary culture.
  
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    ART 475 - Art Industry Entrepreneurship

    3
    Develops entrepreneurial knowledge and practical skills for those wanting to work in the art industry. Covers the important principles required to start a business or obtain a job in the competitive art industry.
  
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    ART 482 - Internship in Art

    1-3
    A project of study planned out by the student and the art program director. The study project could involve working as an assistant for the Fresno Art Museum, various other agencies or doing an apprenticeship with a Fresno artist.
    Signature required; Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited

Intercollegiate Athletics

  
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    ATH 105 - Varsity Men’s Swimming

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 106 - Varsity Men’s Water Polo

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 110 - Varsity Women’s Volleyball

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 115 - Varsity Women’s Swimming

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 116 - Varsity Women’s Water Polo

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 120 - Varsity Men’s Soccer

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 130 - Varsity Women’s Cross Country

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 135 - Varsity Men’s Cross Country

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 140 - Varsity Women’s Basketball

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 145 - Varsity Men’s Basketball

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 150 - Varsity Women’s Track

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 155 - Varsity Men’s Track

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 170 - Varsity Women’s Soccer

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 180 - Varsity Women’s Tennis

    2
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 185 - Varsity Men’s Tennis

    2
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
  •  

    ATH 195 - Varsity Baseball

    0
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course
  
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    ATH 196 - Varsity Cheerleading

    0
    An activity-based course for members of the FPU Cheer Team. Participation includes cheerleading activities that include fitness training, cheer practice, cheer performance at athletic events and representing FPU at select community events.
    Repeatable for credit; Graded C/NC; May not be audited; Activity course

Biblical Studies

  
  •  

    BIB 100 - Jesus and the Christian Community

    3
    Jesus and the Christian Community is the foundational biblical studies course. Jesus, his teachings, the community he founded and the early years of the Christian movement are central themes. Integrated with these themes are explorations of corresponding values and practices that contribute to a successful university experience. The course includes both large group and small group experiences and is led by an interdisciplinary team of university faculty.
  
  •  

    BIB 100A - Jesus and the Christian Community I

    2
    Jesus and the Christian Community is the foundational biblical studies course. Jesus, his teachings, the community he founded and the early years of the Christian movement are central themes. The first semester focuses on the life and teachings of Jesus. Students must complete BIB-100A and BIB-100B to meet the general education requirement. Enrollment in the yearlong sequence is limited to students in the Natural Science STEM program.
    Prerequisites: CP 152  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 100B - Jesus and the Christian Community II

    2
    A continuation of BIB-100A. The second semester focuses on the life and teachings of Jesus, including ways these shaped the early Christian movement and continue to shape contemporary Christian communities. Students must complete BIB-100A and BIB-100B to
    May not be audited
  
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    BIB 106 - Classical Greek I

    3
    An introductory study in Classical Greek from which New Testament or Koine Greek developed. The course emphasizes the acquisition of vocabulary, mastery of forms, fundamentals of Greek grammar and practice in reading portions of the New Testament and passages about Greek life.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 107 - Classical Greek II

    3
    Classical Greek II is a continuation of BIB-106 Classical Greek I. It is an introductory classical language course that provides a systematic introduction to the Classical Greek grammar and Greek literature of fifth century BC Athens. It offers some exposure to Greek history and culture through readings and discussions. The course is intended to meet the needs of students interested in Ancient Greek of the Hellenistic period as well, especially the Koine of the New Testament.
    Prerequisites: BIB 106  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 115 - Hebrew I

    3
    The first half of a one-year beginning biblical Hebrew language course using Communicative Language Teaching methodologies to provide the foundation for fluent reading needed for exegesis and translation. A core vocabulary base of 300-400 lexical items will be built, forming the foundation for internalizing grammar structures. Using Hebrew Bible narrative texts in combination with other written and oral content in simple biblical Hebrew, noun and verb morphology and syntax patterns for biblical Hebrew narrative are introduced and contextually reinforced.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 116 - Hebrew II

    3
    The second half of a one-year beginning biblical Hebrew language course using Communicative Language Teaching methodologies to provide the foundation for fluent reading needed for exegesis and translation. Using Hebrew Bible narrative texts in combination with other written and oral content in simple biblical Hebrew, noun and verb morphology and syntax patterns for biblical Hebrew narrative not covered in Hebrew I are introduced and contextually reinforced. Core vocabulary is likewise expanded.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 215 - Hebrew III

    3
    The first part of intermediate biblical Hebrew. Emphasis is on further internalization of the language and development of verb forms.
    Prerequisites: BIB 116  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 216 - Hebrew IV

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: BIB-215. This fourth semester exegetical course helps students internalize as much Hebrew as possible through production. The production of language is key for its assimilation, and as such most of the class is run in biblical Hebrew, so as to allow students maximum opportunity for production. Students develop sensitivity to exegetical matters that arise from reading the Hebrew Bible.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 300 - Jesus and the Christian Community- Transfer Students

    3
    Jesus and the Christian Community is the foundational biblical studies course. Jesus, his teachings, the community he founded and the early years of the Christian movement are central themes. Integrated with these themes are explorations of corresponding values from the particular tradition that has shaped the identity of FPU.
  
  •  

    BIB 301 - Biblical Studies in Israel

    1-12
    Summer study abroad in Jerusalem - Meets the theology or Biblical portion of the Off-Campus Focus Series.
  
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    BIB 304 - Paul and His Letters

    3
    A study of the place of Paul in the development of the primitive church. The great apostle is studied as a person, writer and thinker. Attention is focused on the ways in which Paul has been understood in both ancient and modern times.
    Take 1 group: BIB 100  or BIB 100A  and BIB 100B  or BIB 300  
  
  •  

    BIB 314 - Jesus and the Christian Community

    3
    A foundational course for all undergraduate students at FPU. An integral and essential part of the Degree Completion program. Central themes include Jesus, his teachings, the community he founded and the early years of the Christian movement. More than simply a traditional Bible class, it provides students with both academic and practical opportunities for learning and growth within the broader community of the Degree Completion program. The interactive approach to learning moves students beyond knowledge and understanding to doing, living and being.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 428 - Biblical Theology

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: one 300-level BLIT course. Traces underlying narratives and key themes across diverse biblical texts; tests various methods of organizing and synthesizing the Bible’s theological witness; examines the relationship between biblical exegesis, theological reflection and Christian practice.
    Take 1 group: BIB 100  or BIB 100A  and BIB 100B  or BIB 300  
  
  •  

    BIB 436 - Biblical Perspectives

    3-4
    Recommended prior coursework: BIB-314. This course is a unique blend of study in the Bible with an eye toward key aspects related to being “the people of God.” As such, it is neither strictly Bible survey, nor merely a topics course. Specific passages have been selected to promote improvement of skills for reading and understanding the Bible (the act of interpretation). Covers a range of literature, styles and time periods, which are representative of other larger blocks of biblical material. Texts correspond to topics key to understanding the dynamics of community living and aspects of healing and wholeness in these texts. Topics explored include community beginning, ordering, leadership, fragmentation, coherence and power. Both textual and topical aspects are kept in creative tension. Skills, creative thinking and application are all goals.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 438 - Biblical Perspectives for Educators

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: BIB-314. This course is a unique blend of study in the Bible with an eye toward key aspects related to being “the people of God.” As such, it is neither strictly Bible survey, nor merely a topics course. Specific passages have been selected to promote improvement of skills for reading and understanding the Bible (the act of interpretation). Covers a range of literature, styles and time periods, which are representative of other larger blocks of biblical material. Texts correspond to topics key to understanding the dynamics of community living and aspects of healing and wholeness in these texts. Topics explored include community beginning, ordering, leadership, fragmentation, coherence and power. Both textual and topical aspects are kept in creative tension. Skills, creative thinking and application are all goals.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 439 - Biblical Perspectives for Social Justice

    3
    This course is a unique blend of study in the Bible with an eye toward key aspects in relation to being “the people of God.” As such, it is neither strictly Bible survey nor merely a topics course. Specific passages have been selected to promote improvement of skills for reading and understanding the Bible (the act of interpretation). Covers a range of literature, styles and time periods, which are representative of other larger blocks of biblical material. Texts correspond to topics key to understanding the dynamics of community living and aspects of healing and wholeness in these texts. Topics explored include community beginning, ordering, leadership, fragmentation, coherence and power. Both textual and topical aspects are kept in creative tension. Skills, creative thinking and application are all goals.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 441 - Biblical Interpretation: to 18th Century

    3
    A survey and analysis of canonization, manuscript evidence, the transmission of text, distinctive schools and figures in the history of interpretation.
  
  •  

    BIB 442 - Biblical Interpretation: 19th-21st Centuries

    3
    A survey of critical approaches to interpretation of the Bible from 1800 to the present. Attention will be given to historical context, key representatives, strengths and weaknesses and developing skill in various approaches.
  
  •  

    BIB 446 - Biblical Perspectives for Health Care

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: BIB-314. This course is a unique blend of study in the Bible with an eye toward key aspects related to being “the people of God.” As such, it is neither strictly Bible survey, nor merely a topics course. Specific passages have been selected to promote improvement of skills for reading and understanding the Bible (the act of interpretation). Covers a range of literature, styles and time periods, which are representative of other larger blocks of biblical material. Texts correspond to topics key to understanding the dynamics of community living and aspects of healing and wholeness in these texts. Topics explored include community beginning, ordering, leadership, fragmentation, coherence and power. Both textual and topical aspects are kept in creative tension. Skills, creative thinking and application are all goals.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 449 - Biblical Perspectives for Criminology

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: BIB-314. This course is a unique blend of study in the Bible with an eye toward key aspects related to being “the people of God.” As such, it is neither strictly Bible survey, nor merely a topics course. Specific passages have been selected to promote improvement of skills for reading and understanding the Bible (the act of interpretation). Covers a range of literature, styles and time periods, which are representative of other larger blocks of biblical material. Texts correspond to topics key to understanding the dynamics of community living and aspects of healing and wholeness in these texts. Topics explored include community beginning, ordering, leadership, fragmentation, coherence and power. Both textual and topical aspects are kept in creative tension. Skills, creative thinking and application are all goals.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 451 - Biblical Perspectives for Leadership

    3
    Recommended prior coursework: BIB-314. This course is a unique blend of study in the Bible with an eye toward key aspects related to being “the people of God.” As such, it is neither strictly Bible survey, nor merely a topics course. Specific passages have been selected to promote improvement of skills for reading and understanding the Bible (the act of interpretation). Covers a range of literature, styles and time periods, which are representative of other larger blocks of biblical material. Texts correspond to topics key to understanding the dynamics of community living and aspects of healing and wholeness in these texts. Topics explored include community beginning, ordering, leadership, fragmentation, coherence and power. Both textual and topical aspects are kept in creative tension. Skills, creative thinking and application are all goals.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIB 483 - Projects in Biblical and Religious Studies

    1-3
    This course culminates the biblical and religious studies major and includes submission of a portfolio, seminar-style presentation and discussion of a major research project.
    May not be audited

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 100 - Principles of Biology

    4
    An examination of the cell, inheritance, ecology, human biology, the diversity of life and evolutionary theory. Emphasis is given to understanding central concepts and to the process of science. Attention is also given to the relationships between biology and Christian faith and practice. It provides foundational understandings for general education and liberal studies. Science majors should take BIOL 111  and BIOL 121 .
    Corequisite: BIOL 100L  
  
  •  

    BIOL 100L - Principles of Biology Lab

    0
    Corequisite: BIOL 100  
    $100 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC
  
  •  

    BIOL 111 - General Biology: Cells and Physiology

    4
    Introduction and general study of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, biotechnology and animal physiology and anatomy, with an emphasis on human applications and bioethics. Intended for majors or minors in the natural sciences.
    Corequisite: BIOL 111L  
  
  •  

    BIOL 111H - General Biology: Cells and Physiology

    4
    Introduction and general study of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, biotechnology and animal physiology and anatomy, with an emphasis on human applications and bioethics. Lecture equivalent to BIOL 111 , with honors lab and discussion section. Includes analysis of primary scientific literature, introduction to hypothesis testing and individual research project.
    Corequisite: BIOL 111LH  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIOL 111L - General Biology: Cells and Physiology Lab

    0
    Corequisite: BIOL 111  
    $100 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC
  
  •  

    BIOL 111LH - General Biology: Cells and Physiology Lab

    0
    $100 laboratory fee; Corequisite: BIOL 111H  
    Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIOL 121 - General Biology: Diversity and Ecology

    4
    Introduction and general study of ecology, evolution, plant anatomy and physiology, taxonomy and a survey of the major taxa of the kingdoms of life. Attention given to issues of biology and Christian faith. Intended for majors or minors in the natural sciences.
    Corequisite: BIOL 121L  
  
  •  

    BIOL 121H - General Biology: Diversity and Ecology

    4
    Introduction and general study of ecology, evolution, plant anatomy and physiology, taxonomy and a survey of the major taxa of the kingdoms of life. Attention given to issues of biology and Christian faith. Lecture equivalent to BIOL-120L, with honors lab and discussion section. Includes analysis of primary scientific literature, introduction to hypothesis testing and an individual research project.
    Corequisite: BIOL 121LH  
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIOL 121L - General Biology: Diversity and Ecology Lab

    0
    Introduction and general study of ecology, evolution, plant anatomy and physiology, taxonomy and a survey of the major taxa of the kingdoms of life. Attention given to issues of biology and Christian faith. Intended for majors or minors in the natural sciences.
    Corequisite: BIOL 121  
    $100 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC
  
  •  

    BIOL 121LH - General Biology: Diversity and Ecology Lab

    0
    Corequisite: BIOL 121H  
    $100 laboratory fee; Graded C/NC; May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIOL 125 - Introduction to Biology

    3
    A foundational course that examines the central concepts of cellular biology, human biology, genetics, evolution, taxonomy and ecology.
    May not be audited
  
  •  

    BIOL 220 - Healthcare in the United States

    2
    Explores the structure of healthcare delivery in the United States. Organizational, economic, political, and social perspectives are developed. Issues such as quality of care, roles of public health, contrasts between national and global health systems and indicators are explored. In addition, course participants self-assess personal characteristics and interests to develop and explore a career plan associated with a specific professional path in the health sciences.
  
  •  

    BIOL 311 - Field Botany

    4
    Study of vascular plant morphology, taxonomy, physiology and ecology. Emphasis given to field identification, methods of study of plant communities and experimental analysis. Three weekend field trips required.
    Prerequisites: BIOL 121  or BIOL 121H  
    Corequisite: BIOL 311L  
  
  
  •  

    BIOL 312 - Ecology

    4
    A study of the interrelationships between organisms and their environment and an analysis of the principle factors contributing to the distribution and abundance of living organisms. Participation in field trips is required.
    Prerequisites: BIOL 100  BIOL 121  or ENV 150  
    Corequisite: BIOL 312L  
 

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